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Cleaning & finishing Oak doors

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by stevewaite, 19 Dec 2007.

  1. stevewaite

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    :?: I have just had solid Oak doors installed. I like the finish as they are but need to treat them. We already have some small fingerprints on them and wish to clean them and treat them to prevent any long term staining.
    I have tried various oils and mat & Satin varnishes on offcuts but would like to know the best thing.
    I have also heard that if I clean them first with white spirit, this will remove any dirt before treating
     
  2. RigidRaider

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    We are replacing all the nasty old "Victorian" 6 panel doors in our house with modern oak veneered pine doors. I would suggest you remove the oily stains immediately with a rag dampened with white spirit or turps substitute or kerosine. You should have varnished the door before installing it as it will now be drying out fast in the heating.

    We are using Dulux trade polyurethane varnish in satin, which leaves a fantastic smooth sheen after 3 coats and is extremely easy to apply, being very forgiving of mistakes or my bad technique. It looks very discreet and just like the finish you see in posh offices or hotels. In contrast I once tried Ronseal, which was a disaster - it was glossy and showed all the brush marks looking absolutely terrible.

    I believe the Dulux trade varnish is only available from Dulux Decorator Centres. I can't get it from B&Q or my local paint specialist.

    You need to rub down between coats and make sure you varnish the hinge and lock rebates too, to prevent drying.
     
  3. stevewaite

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    Excellent, thanks for this, I'm sure my Chirpy Chippy will be reading this so I won't moan that they were not protected first.
    I will have a look for the Dulux product and give it a try.

    Thanks again
     
  4. Bespoke

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    Hi

    Please, please don’t use oil based ( polyurethane ) varnish it will yellow in a short space of time and water based varnish will give a milky white cast to the finish and spoil your lovely oak doors. You have seen knotty pine after a couple of mouths which as gone a deep honey colour that’s polyurethane. Clean the doors as suggested using white sprit and 0000 wire wool. Sand the doors to 320 grit paper. And then seal with two coats of precat lacquer. Or you can use Danish oil. And finally never use spray polish this will trap the dirt in. Believe me polyurethane is a no, no and is never used by a professional wood finisher unless a honey colour is required.
     
  5. RigidRaider

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    Alan, I have 6 more doors to do so I'm interested in this pre-catalysed lacquer. Presumably this is what is used by manufacturers of those nice oak or beech finished doors you see in public buildings, offices etc? The discreet sheen looks so good with stainless steel furniture.

    I was thinking the professionals might be using something like the Dulux Trade PE varnish but spraying it rather than brushing.

    I do agree about the yellowing but we don't mind that too much in our house - it's more a darker shade of brown than yellow. Would I be able to buy pre-cat easily? Presumably it needs a spray gun? Possibly therefore not suitable for a DIYer like me who only manages one door every couple of months? Do you think a local professional might undertake to prepare and spray six doors for me once I had cut the rebates?
     
  6. Bespoke

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    Hi

    Yes pre-catalysed lacquer is what the professionals use in the furniture industry and on most cabinetry including doors in public buildings and it is what I use on my cabinetry (check out my website by going to my profile page) A good finish is not looks fantastic but looks thin like french polish with french polish you can get a deep gloss but it don’t look thick and plastic like varnish etc and that’s the same with pre-catalysed lacquer you get a first class finish without it looking thick and like plastic, plus you get very good knock ability (will sand up to most things life will throw at it in the normal home).

    The lacquer is cellulose based and can be applied by spray or by brush but the brush will need to be what is known as in the trade as a polishing mops and the best are made from squirrel hair and depending on the size start from around £30.00. But to do a door you will need a size 14 and that will cost around £60.00.

    Drop me a line from my website and I will give you a quotation to do your doors that’s if you wish, they would me better finished once they have been fitted so there will be no need to disturb the finish.
     

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