cleaning plaster off wood

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by Ish, 16 May 2005.

  1. Ish

    Ish

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    hi

    what is the best way to clean plaster of brand new wood??

    a plasterer i used managed to get plaster on my new skirting boards & door frames which are unpainted/un varnished

    cheers
     
  2. kozzymodo

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    A gentle rub down with a piece of sandpaper or even a brush should move it, its actually quite soft.
     
  3. Ish

    Ish

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    thanks.

    i'll give it a try :)
     
  4. Thermo

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    damp sponge should shift it with some elbow grease
     
  5. HIGHRISE

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    You have a problem because often liquids or substances will soak into new timber and stain it because it`s not sealed in any way. Good luck.
     
  6. Zampa

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    Dont hang around as the plaser often 'burns' the wood and will leave marks that are virtually impossible to remove.
     
  7. aflemi

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    I'm worried now I read this. I had an extension built with about 10 new hardwood framed windows. I have a LOT of new plaster marks on the hardwood. Building work finished 6 months ago and I am getting round to decorating. I have tried scrubbing them with toothbrush, lots of elbow grease with cloth and hot water, sugar soap etc but little success.
    I notice that they look fine when damp but dry out with plaster still ingrained and little improvement. I had hoped that when I come to seal them, the effect would be the same as when they are wet. From reading this topic it looks like I will struggle to clean them, can anyone recommend a sealer which will cover them up to best effect. Should I complain to the builder? I thought the marks would wash off fairly easily so didn't make a fuss when they finished.
     
  8. noseall

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    you should not let British gypsum any where near untreated hardwood.

    as said previously, plaster is very acidic and reacts with hardwood.

    your plasterer should have advised you to seal the wood prior to plastering. :eek: :rolleyes:
     
  9. aflemi

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    Thanks Noseall. The plasterer was subcontracted by the buider, who has an excellent reputation and is very experienced. I find it hard to believe he has let this happen. Do you agree I have a case against the builder for him to make the best of it? Obviously he won't replace 10 window frames, but he should clean them up to best effect?
     
  10. aflemi

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    Before I go back to the builder, I want to test the result of a sealer on a small area that is badly affected and that I have got as much plaster off as I think possible. Can anyone recommend the best product for this, I want a polished sheen/silk finish. If the product is also good for the exterior, that would be a bonus..... Appreciate your input on this friends....
     
  11. Growler

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    It sounds to me like it's your responsibility as you don't seem to have employed a Painter and decorator to do the job, or indeed put a coat on first, If you had, you wouldn't have this problem. You've taken too long to do the wood and made a mistake.
     
  12. aflemi

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    Growler, what difference does it make whether I have "appointed a painter" ? This is a DIY forum. The delay doesn't mean the builder is any less liable. What I'm looking for is some advice on what is the best product to use now. Anybody have any constructive suggestions please?
     
  13. Growler

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    Well actually it's because of the delay that you're in this position.
    You delayed.

    On a daily basis, Painters and decorators deal with these issues of plasterers, electricians, joiners etc ...but you left it, decided to do it yourself, and are now looking to blame someone else.

    The builder isn't liable.... you are.
     
  14. aflemi

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    Ok, let's get back to my original question as the rest is hypothetical and doesn't help fix the problem. Can anyone recommend a sealer which will cover them up to best effect?
     

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