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condensation = airbrick solution?

Discussion in 'Building' started by seneca, 9 Nov 2006.

  1. seneca

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    My front porch is double glazed and has no ventilation in it. As the weather has gotten colder there is lots of condensation on all the panes of glass. I have to leave the door open all day just to get rid of it. As there are no vents on the double glazing I need to get some air into the porch. I assume I'm right in thinking that if cold air from outside could get into the porch then the condensation would stop, or be reduced. There is a bit of 2 brick thick solid wall (not cavity) on one side and I was thinking of putting an air brick in. Will this help my condensation problem? Is so what is the best way to fit an airbrick. Or is there some kind of a vent that I could use instead? If so what's it called?

    I imagine I will have to remove 2 bricks (one behind the other), so what's the best way to do it? I was thinking of drilling through each brick (one from each side) with a fat bit and then trying to chisel the bits of brick out? Is this the best way of not damaging any of the surrounding bricks?

    just thought... what if the bricks aren't exactly one behind the other..... could be tricky.

    any advice would be much appreciated
     
  2. JohnD

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    Easier than taking bricks out, you could use a core drill (easily hired) to cut neat holes in the brickwork.

    I would have thought a waste-pipe sized hole in each side would give enough flow.

    If you prefer you could use a 105mm hole (as used for extractor fan ducts). there are neat plastic covers and vents to fit. this kind of hole is often used to ventilate boiler rooms as well (one high and one low).
     
  3. seneca

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    how does a core drill differ from a normal one. Is it more powerful, or does it have a special bit. what size is a waste pipe.
     
  4. JohnD

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    A core drill

    [​IMG]

    Like cutting the core out of an apple.

    You can hire them locally. they are fairly expensive to buy if you are only going to use it once, You need a big SDS machine to drive them, that you can also hire.
     

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