Connecting a new free-standing electric oven

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by ElRay, 24 Aug 2007.

  1. ElRay

    Joined:
    24 Aug 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cornwall
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The previous occupants of my recently-bought home left behind an electric oven on which the thermostat doesn't work. It's seen better days & i'd like to replace it with another free-standing electric oven of similar size. However, the on/off switch (control unit?) is located on the opposite wall (kitchen is 2.35m wide). The wiring appears to go into the wall immediately behind the oven &, presumably, across the ceiling & into the opposite wall to connect to the control unit (?).

    My question is this, can any new oven I buy be easily connected up to the existing wiring or am I looking at having to completely re-model my kitchen just to get a new oven?
     
  2. JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    38,465
    Thanks Received:
    1,542
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    when you say "oven" do you mean "oven" or do you mean "cooker?"
     
  3. ElRay

    Joined:
    24 Aug 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cornwall
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It's a cooker - double oven with 4-ring ceramic hob.

    I also meant to say that I'm aware that fuses must be compatible. I don't intend to perform any installation myself, I'll get someone qualified to do it. I just need to know if the existing wiring/cables can be used without having to re-wire the kitchen.
     
  4. davy_owen_88

    Joined:
    17 Nov 2006
    Messages:
    1,680
    Thanks Received:
    2
    Location:
    West Glamorgan
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    To answer that you will need to tell us what size the cables are and what conditions they run through. You will also need to know the load of the new cooker/oven/hob.
     
  5. JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    38,465
    Thanks Received:
    1,542
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Look at your consumer unit (fusebox). You should find an MCB (looks like a switch) or a fuse, labelled "cooker". What letters and numbers are on it, or, if a fuse what colour dots does it have?

    About how old is the CU, and does it look like a professional job? (if you can post a pic that will help).

    If there are no labels, invest in some white tape and a marker pen, and turn them off one at a time to see what each does.

    Look behind the old cooker. Is there a plastic connection box, about the size of a single socket, with a thick cable coming out of it?
     
  6. ElRay

    Joined:
    24 Aug 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cornwall
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The fusebox was upgraded last year, on opening it I can see a label beneath one of the switches showing "Cooker - 32A".

    I haven't yet selected a replacement cooker. Presumably when I do whoever installs it will, if necessary, upgrade the fuse on that circuit. Since my intention is to get another cooker with similar configuration to the existing cooker (fan oven + oven/grill + 4-ring ceramic hob) there may be no difference in electrical supply requirements.

    When I pull the cooker away from it's current location, the cable goes straight into the wall, behind plater & tiles. There is no visible box.

    Can the installer simply unscrew the existing cable from the back of the old cooker & re-connect it to the new cooker (after replacing fuses in the fusebox, if needed)?
     
  7. Steve

    Joined:
    15 Apr 2005
    Messages:
    16,009
    Thanks Received:
    226
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You seem obsessed with replacing the fuse/MCB. You wont need to. 32 amps is plenty.

    And replacing with MCB will normally mean replacing the cable. Which you probably dont want.

    And you can DIY, theres nothing to stop you, as this work is non-notifiable. It is a straight swap. :D
     
  8. JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    38,465
    Thanks Received:
    1,542
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    But it would be A Good Idea to fix a cooker outlet to the wall to terminate the cables in

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I prefer the ones with a removable cover separate from the block inside. AFAIK Crabtree and MK are still like that, but some of the others are in one piece and more difficult, with the big thick cables. You can sometimes tell by looking to see that the external screw heads are not in quite the same place as usual.

    p.s. a cooker with an electric oven and a gas hob is best to cook with
     
  9. ElRay

    Joined:
    24 Aug 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cornwall
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thank you JohnD & Crafty for your responses. I don't want to replace any fuses & the suggestion that I can simply detach the old cooker from existing cabling & connect it to the new cooker is good news. It gives me more confidence to get out there & select a replacement cooker.

    I take your point about getting someting fitted to the wall behind the cooker & will investigate that.

    Unfortunately we do not have natural gas piped to our village (north coast Cornwall ~4miles south west of Newquay) & I already have oil-fired ch with huge oil tank & don't also want to have loads of Calor gas cylinders hanging around as well. Dual fuel was something we could enjoy back in Hampshire before moving here & it remains a happy memory.
     

Share This Page