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Door, which side to open

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by emoose, 7 Feb 2011.

  1. emoose

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    Help me with a domestic issue before we have to deploy UN peace keepers :)
    In the boxroom/office the door currently open inwards hinged on the right as in the quality diagram below.

    I think this is wrong as it obscures the room and stops you putting anything behind the door.

    I want to hinge it on the other side so it still opens inwards but against the wall, giving a better usable space.

    This is wrong she says and also "not right".

    What does the panel advise?

    [​IMG][/img] :)
     
  2. JohnD

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    That is the "correct" way. When the door opens, it first passes close to the nearest return wall before you walk through it or poke you head round.

    This is so that any draught goes towards the close wall, and if someone opens the door without knocking, you have a moment to adjust your clothing before they can see you. And if it is left slightly open, anyone walking past can't peep in.
     
  3. emoose

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    Thanks for the info, it makes sense when you explain it like that.

    Would it be such a sin to swap the hinge side though? it would make the room a lot more "usable".

    Only issue I can see is with the door banging against the wall, which a door stop should prevent.
     
  4. big-all

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    dont forget to move the light switch ;)
     
  5. crank39

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    When at college we were told doors always open into the room, can't remember if we were given a reason why but it always stuck with me and i too have had sometimes heated debates as to why
     
  6. JohnD

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    You mean "into the room" rather than "into the corridor?"

    So they don't bash into people walking by.
     
  7. crank39

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    No, i meant into the room as opposed to into the room but against a wall if you get me :rolleyes:
     
  8. ladylola

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    Yes I was always taught that a door should be hung as above to "shield" a room when opening giving some degree of privacy to the ocupants.
    That said most doors in my house obey this "rule" with the exception of the bathroom door :eek: a room where privacy would be wanted more than elsewhere. A small box room has the door hung correctly but strangely enough the light switch has been set to accomidate hanging the other way :confused:
    The decision really is yours, if it's more practical then reverse it but as said before you will have to move the light switch.
     
  9. Aqua

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    Just to add my two penny worth, the above answers are correct. I was always told a bedroom door opens as in your quality diagram to protect the modesty of someone, if that should be necessary.
    However, usually downstairs doors or non bedroom doors are supposed to open the opposite way......or so i was told lol.
    In truth i don't suppose it really matters now a days, if it makes it more practicle for you to change the way the door hangs go for it.
    Strangely as another poster mentioned, my bathroom door opens 'the wrong way' also, never thought about it before now...
     
  10. jesteh

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    On our 1930s house all the doors opened inwards obscuring the room. I have been told by our architect that was the old way - it was to protect privacy of the occupants - in the same way as all light pendants were off centre towards the windows. As we renovated throughout we had a chance to change the doors and we have made is so all the doors open against the wall now. Again architect's 2p - this is the modern way as it draws you inside the room and provides light and open spaces with door neatly out of way.

    Everything aside - we changed all 14 doors to use this as it allowed us far better use of space - you can put furniture and beds in space thats otherwise occupied by the swinging door (I suspect this is also why modern houses with small rooms are designed this way). Also, I don't know how you live but we tend to leave doors open most of the time and it does mean open door is neatly out of way.

    I'd stick to your guns - you are right :cool:
     
  11. emoose

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    Cheers for all the feedback. I feel fully armed and ready for another "discussion"!
     
  12. foxhole

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    You have to remember you are arguing with a woman where logic and common sense count for nought. :confused:
     
  13. emoose

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    Switched it this weekend, looks loads better and she said so unprompted!
     

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