Flow Rate for 10mm plastic pipe.

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by willp2, 13 Oct 2007.

  1. willp2

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    I read the post on Smiths under plinth heaters there was no ref to size of input pipes, I wish to spur off the heating system with plastic 10mm will this support enough flow rate (70gph) I think is what is required. I have a Combi system
     
  2. gas4you

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    Can't see a problem with this, 10mm usually will take up to 10,000 btu's.
     
  3. Agile

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    It all depends on the length of 10 mm tube!

    And the rating of the heater!

    Because these are such good heaters I would normally fit with 15 mm to ensure they get enough heat input.

    I would ask why use 10 mm ??

    Tony
     
  4. willp2

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    because I'm lazy and 10mm is already in situ from the rad I'm changing it with thanks anyway
     
  5. Softus

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    So, you're actually sharing the heat capacity of 10mm between the rad (and maybe more than one) and the plinth heater.

    I wouldn't use microbore unless it was illegal not to - if the system isn't clean enough it'll block up quicker than you can say "magnetite".
     
  6. chrishutt

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  7. Softus

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    Chris, my comment was meant to be in context - I've seen it happen where a plinth heater, because of the nature of its use, is out of circulation for long periods, and there can be a build up where the supply tees in to the rest of the circuit. I've also seen a plinth heater that seemed to act as a sump for every bit of grunge in the system, and defied attempts to clean it out. And don't forget - the velocity through each rad (and plinth heater) is independent of the water velocity in the supply pipework.
     

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