Help-do I need a Corgi Registered person to fit aGas cooker?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Girlygirl123, 7 Nov 2008.

  1. Girlygirl123

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    Hello - I'm new to this site and in desperate need of some advice.
    Can anyone answer me this question? My prospective father in law is fitting my new kitchen, and whilst I'm extremerly impressed with his work we are at lockerheads over whether or not it's 'allowed' for him to fit the new gas cooker. I'm positive he's more than capable of doing the job, but are there any guidelines or restrictions I need to follow? I'm worried it could jeapordise 'red tape' on the home insurance should there be a fire or an accident of some sort.

    Should it be a Corgi Registered professional?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. mattylad

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    Does it have the quick release gas fitting?
     
  3. Girlygirl123

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    God knows.... I can find out would that make a difference then?
    Thx
     
  4. Symptoms

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    girly - a quick release gas fitting will look like this:
    a bayonet fitting

    or like this:
    a Micropoint socket

    one of these (you can also get a straight bayonet - the one in the picture is an elbow) will be on the end of a gas supply pipe in the kitchen. If you have either of these you (or your nearly Father-in-Law) can attach the matching cooker hose (rubber hose with the brass fittings at the end) to this; it's a simple push & turn. You do not have to use a Corgi guy for this.

    New pipework, alterations to the old pipes and rigid pipe connections to the appliance then you should use a Corgi guy. This isn't just about 'red tape' regarding the Home Insurance, it's a legal requirement to use a properly qualified person to do gas work; the Corgi organisation just happens to have a very large number of qualified people 'on it's books'.
     
  5. mattylad

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    on the back of the cooker, thick black rubber pipe with a brass fitting on the end.

    I'm sure an RGI will be along later to argue whether or not you can plug one in :D
     
  6. Girlygirl123

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    WOW!!! :eek:
    How good are you guys?
    I'm so impressed. Thanks ever so much. I'm a happy bunny to have the right guidance. This will definitley help the harmony within my prospective kitchen / prospective Father In Law..... ;)
    (And I've even got the hang of the smiley things).
    Thanks! xxx
     
  7. Symptoms

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    Girly - kind words are always welcome, but ...

    we're dying to know what fittings, if any, you have?
     
  8. Girlygirl123

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    Sorry symptoms and mattylad - it's a Microsoft fitting. I mean Micropoint...yes that's it.
     
  9. Girlygirl123

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    MICROPOINT SOCKET! :rolleyes:
     
  10. JPC

    JPC

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    it seems to me he is fitting a new cooker, so all this talk of bayonet fittings is inconsequential. it needs an rgi to install, re gas supply ok? kit units distances ok? safety chain? gas pipe position ok? Provide you with a gas work notification certificate to confirm the authenticity of the installation etc....

    if no major pipework required than £50-65
     
  11. kirkgas

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    i am fed up hearing people say "huh how hard can it be to fit a gas cooker there is already one there" but the considerations for you (or your FIL) are: do you have test equipment, correct PTFE tape for gas, leak detector fluid, sufficient knowledge to purge and relight the existing appliances when complete? is the cooker suitable for the property (if a flat etc does it have FSD?) can you test the connections you made? is the new cooker hose OK? is the new cooker leaking? are the clearences correct? does it have a stability bracket etc etc , i would agree fitting a repacement gas cooker is easy, but i think it is easy cause i am a plumber and have been sealing and soldering pipes for 30 years, i am qualified in gas and have done CKR1 to confirm i know what i need to know about fitting cookers. AND I BET I'VE MISSED ITEMS FROM MY LIST!!!!!!!!
    i have spoken to people who have fitted them and not had a problem BUT is it worth it?
     
  12. ChrisR

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    Q:
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    Yes!
     
  13. Girlygirl123

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    I'll get a Corgi registered pro. Better safe than sorry.
    Thanks for the help all.
     
  14. foxhole

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    Of course even a Corgi man can c*ck it up.The only thing guaranteed is your death.
     
  15. Agile

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    The simple answer is :-

    If the cooker already has a hose AND there is already a suitable socket then it can be considered a DIY activity to connect them together.

    However, as explained above there are other aspects to fitting a cooker!

    Furthermore, although most cooker bayonet or micropoint connectors are gas tight they have been know to leak and ideally should be tested for leakage by a CORGI who will also consider all the other aspects like that safety chain etc.

    Tony
     

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