1. We are pleased to announce the 'Home Automation' forum. Click here to get involved!

Help with a small hole in external wall

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by sing2trees, 7 Oct 2008.

  1. sing2trees

    Joined:
    7 Oct 2008
    Messages:
    2
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Antrim
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi,
    We have a hole in the wall going from outside into our kitchen, were I assume an old outlet pipe went through.

    We now have the joys of mice in the kitchen cupboard, where the hole is.
    I have traps down and have caught a few mice, but I want to block up the hole!

    Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can do so? I am a DIY newbie, and cannot access the hole on the inside, only the outside.

    Any advice gratefully welcomed!

    Thanks

    Ben
     
  2. mobileman

    Joined:
    22 Sep 2008
    Messages:
    50
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cheshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Is it a brick wall? What size is the hole?

    Simply mix up 4 parts sand to 1 part cement with a bit of water so that it's not too sloppy but wet enough to work with. A splash of washing up liquid will help you mix it.

    Fill hole and job done.
     
  3. sing2trees

    Joined:
    7 Oct 2008
    Messages:
    2
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Antrim
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for that! Being a complete newbie, I take it I can buy a smallish pack of cement from homebase or b&q?

    The hole is approx 3inch diameter. The wall is brick with a loose stone rendering.

    Hope that makes sense!
     
  4. Blasphemous

    Joined:
    2 Oct 2006
    Messages:
    6,654
    Thanks Received:
    15
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You don't need and I wouldn't put any 'washing up liquid' in the mix. Yes you can buy a pack of premixed sand and cement from B&Q etc. The bag should tell you how to mix in the water but just pour water in small amounts and mix until you get a consistency that is pliable but not too sloppy. If you think its too sloppy you can add a bit more sand and cement but its better not to do that. You might be better mixing a small amount first to see how you get on.

    You may find it easier and more stable to add a few bits of brick/stone into the hole when you are filling it as the mortar can and probably will sink . You may have to do it in two stages. One initial fill and then go back to it once that has set to fill in any gaps that have appeared. As I say, the mortar will sink a bit.

    As for not being able to access the inside. You need to make sure you get any filling in right to the other side as it may well be that the little bu**ers can get access under the floor and up through the wall cavity. You'll be amazed how and where mice can get to! They can come in under the external doors if the Weather Bar isn't a close fit.
     
  5. JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    38,350
    Thanks Received:
    1,533
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    if you are filling from one side, you want to push it in deep without it falling out on the other side. try to cut some stiff cardboard to a shape you can wedge into the hole tight enough to block the far end. Once you have filled the far end and it has stiffened it will be easier. you will find it easier if the mortar is a bit stiffer than a cake mix, so you can mould it in your fist into a ball and it does not slump like mud. It will dry out a bit in contact with the bricks as they will absorb some moisture.

    if it is a cavity wall, you should protect the cavity to prevent mortar falling down it. A good way is to stuff scraps of fibreglass loft insulation into the cavity until no more will go. otherwise you will have to make up a partial liner, like a rolled up bit of cardboard. it has to keep its shape until the mortar has gone stiff, so it needs to resist being wet.

    do not let the mortar dry out quickly, especially on the surface if it is sunny (fat chance!) you can keep it from drying by sticking or taping a bit of plastic over it. Leave the cover in place for a week if you can.

    If you put in too much mortar, it will look dark grey (and will also crack). A sandy mix will probably blend in better.

    if it is too smooth you can rough it up a bit by stroking with a dry brush before it sets.

    you can mix up enough to get started in a paint tin or ice-cream carton. I would use a filling knife and a bit of wood to poke it in.

    wrap your left-over cement tightly and keep it dry for the next little job.
     

Share This Page