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How to close/seal off a pipe

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by itgoodson, 26 Aug 2008.

  1. itgoodson

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    Location:
    Leeds
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi

    I am a somewhat of a beginner when it comes to DIY, and esp regarding plumbing. Here is the problem I'm facing -

    We have a dis-used outside toilet. It has been disconnected all the time we have lived here (about 18 months)

    FOr a long time I have heard the hissing of water coming from somewhere inside the small outhouse that contains the toilet, but I have only just discovered the cause - the main piper that takes water into the toilet cistern (it emerges from under the ground) has been severed about half a yard from the ground and then what looks like electrical tape has been bound around the end.

    The electrical tape has given way to the water pressure and a constant thin stream of water is hissing out.

    I went to Wickes to try and find something I could put over the end of the pipe to close it off, but I didn't really know what to look for and was short of time, so I just bought some more electrical tape and bound the end of the pipe up again.

    It has slowed the stream of water, but it is far from sound, with water still forcing its way through.

    So... any ideas what I need to do to close this pipe off? I'm concerned that its costing lots of money all this water!

    The problem might be slightly complicated by the fact that the end of the pipe is not circular - the pipe seems to be more of an elipse/oval when looked at from the end. Has it been bent out of shape?

    Thanks for any much-needed advice!

    Ian
     
  2. hi1

    hi1

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    1. Turn off the water, stop cock in house.
    2. Look at diameter of pipe emerging from floor, or even measure across the end having taken the tape off
    3. If you have a junior hacksaw or the like the select a point below the oval part of the pipe and then cut straight across keeping the blade square to the pipe. If you deviate a bit square the cut off with a file
    4. Return to wickes either purchase a service valve of the size for the pipe you have previously measured or buy a compression stop end, a cap with an olive and nut, again the correct size.
    5 Return, with which ever you have got, then put the nut over the pipe followed by the olive and then the fitting.Make sure the pipe enters the fitting enough, there is a step in the fitting that the pipe should rest against. Hold the fitting to stop it rotating(pump pliers) . Bring the nut up the pipe so that the olive enters the fitting, tighten , adjustable spanner will do, but don't over tighten.
    6 turn water back on check for leaks. If there is try tightening the nut slightly
    good luck
     
  3. itgoodson

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    That is just brilliant - thanks very much!
     
  4. undercover

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    Location:
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    Its often lead pipe running through to the old outside toilets.
     

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