how to remove paint around window that has upvc frames

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by snomys, 7 Feb 2011.

  1. snomys

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    I want to take on a project myself this spring, but Im unsure whats the best approach for removing the current paint.

    I want to strip the paint backon the external masonry, currently looks like a lot of layers from decades, peeling away, then Id like to prime it and repaint.

    I was thinking of using a heat gun but im really worried about using that when the masonry runs right up against the upvc frames, i presume the plastic may melt or burn.

    Does anyone have any idea whats the best way to do this? I also thought masking it off with foil or something, but as its a Victorian bay window that may be costly and time consuming.

    Finally, can anyone recommend a good primer and masonry paint for the ledge and sill of a 1900's victorian terraced bay window.
     
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  2. spada01

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    The heat gun will wreck your windows! I'd just sand down to teh point where you can get sight of some bits of concrete and that will hold the new paint on. I've just used standard undercoat and then masonry paint for such sills and it worked well.
     
  3. vv2806

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    The heat gun didn't ruin my plastic windows, I am not sure if it's worth using it on the exterior though. Might be easy to sand down. If you insist on using a heat gun, buy a solder pad (something like this http://www.wickes.co.uk/Solder-Pad/invt/421643). It is supposed to protect timber and other materials that can be damaged by heat. I used one to protect the windows while stripping multiple layers of paint from the windowsill.
     

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