How to stop Efflorescence

Discussion in 'Building' started by benr, 10 Nov 2004.

  1. benr

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    In my plastered basement I have Efflorescence salts (white cotton fluff) coming through the wall in certain places.

    I understand how this is formed and that it requires salt and a water source. The Water source has been identified, but will take some time for me to resolve but I will do this at some point...

    What I want to know is how can I stop the Efflorescence salts coming though the paint/plaster work in the interim until I resolve the water source issue? Is there some type of paint/solution which will prevent the salts appearing on the wall?

    I have tried Thompsons Damp Seal paint, but the salts lift this off the plaster in bubbles, and once they crack the salts start appearing again.
     
  2. masterbuilder

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    see page 3 of thread 'damp on interior wall' and click on the link i put there.
     
  3. benr

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    I have checked this link and there are many options at this site. Are you affiliated with this comapny?

    Most of the options seem to be plastic sheeting of some sort 'plastered' into the wall. I don't really want to go down this path...Is there some solution/paint I can apply direct to the paster work?
     
  4. oilman

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    Ah, you're back then :D

    yours affectionately

    a**hole :evil:
     
  5. masona

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    Oh Oilman, he's back all right, masterbuilder is so nice to me now and wrote some nice stuff about me last night :eek: , it was so bad the moderator deleted it. Who dares wins :LOL:
    benr,
    Just spoken to a surveyor friend of mine this afternoon and he said this,

    Remove the efflorescence with a soft wire brush or scraper, then wash down the wall with 1 part phosphoric to 7 parts water. Will burn you so wear the correct safetly gear then wash down with water then sealed with epoxy primer acrylic masonary sealer. You must also bear in mind this is only a short term temporary solution and may create a problem somewhere else ! As you said you should resolve the water source issue first.
     
  6. oilman

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    That's a shame, I missed it. I suppose he'll write some compliments again soon :?:
     
  7. benr

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    Thanks for the advice.

    I am new to this forum, but it is like a soap opera! Will tune in tomorrow
     
  8. masterbuilder

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    I am not affiliated to safeguard but i use do/have used their products which are affiliated to this forum and the link can be found on the bottom of 1 of these pages under 'damp'
    masona, you still have no practical advice to offer, your suggestion is pointless, and oilman, yes, u know what you are
     
  9. oilman

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    .....and we all know what you are, don't we?

    So safegaurd's products are affiliated to this forum, are they? What a meaningless statement. They may advertise on the website, is this what you meant?

    Masona's suggestion was possibly some practical help, your statements seem to be mostly advertising plugs. Masona seems to be able to engage in discussion, you seem only to be able to make dogmatic statements and to be as personally offensive as possible to the extent the moderator (to whom you have reported us for being ill informed and otherwise worse than useless) has to delete your posts.

    Sleep well, ;) (don't forget you aren't going to reply to any more of my posts)

    as shole
     
  10. legs-akimbo

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    Ahh yes what was it now efflorescence, got distracted.!

    Efflorescence should be allowed to weather away naturally (particually on new build) but it may be removed by using a stiff bristled brush, but not a wire one. The deposits should be collected and removed so that they do not enter the masonary at lower levels . Any deposits remaining can be removed or reduced by treatment with clean cold water. Since the deposits are water solluble washing down may result in the solution being partially re absorbed. This may be minimised by using a clean damp sponge, which should be rinsed frequently in clean water. Recurrent efflorescence in older established brickwork may almost always be taken as an indication that considerable quantities of water are entering the masonary as a result of failure of weathering and other protective measures, faulty downspouts gutters and the like.
    Chemical methods should never be used for the removal of efflorescence.

    Regards

    Robbo.
     
  11. masona

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    100% agreed with you here and the rest of your post, the advice I've given to benr from my surveror did say it is not the solution method because the efflorescence can re-occurr again. As you say drying it out is the only way at the moment.
    As long as benr understand it won't solved the problem which I made it quite clear.
     
  12. masona

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    It was, I did say it wasn't the solution to the problem as benr couldn't wait for whatever reason.
    I tried to be fair & square and listening to all party's whether I agree or not. I can never be like masterbuilder who seem to be a aggressive bullying types who demand things done their way and always know best.

    Thanks Oilman.
     
  13. jdw0624

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    I feel your pain. Products that repel water or minimize water intrusion can certainly help but they are rarely a permanent solution. Of course the ideal solution would be to include an admixture in the cement/masonry mixture at the batching stage. But obviously, you've got to use plan B. Fortunately, there are still some solutions you can still take to permanently stop efflorescence from manifesting itself on existing masonry surfaces. You need to use a product that absorbs into the substrate and chemically reacts with and binds the salt based impurities when hydrogen (H) is present. These products will fuse the sodium and convert it into non-sodium material and other harmless matter that will not leach out over time. Some products out there even use nanotechnology to react with cement chemicals at a nanomolecular level. Again, reducing the water with a silicone or silane product can help. But it's only a temporary solution. You want a product that actually reacts water (H2O) to produce the permanent results you're after. Hope your project is a success. I feel your pain.
     
  14. tony1851

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    Well, what products are those, then?
     
  15. dishman

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    Wow - this is a near 10 year thread revivial!
     

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