Installing an induction hob

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Rogercranstoun, 29 Dec 2011.

  1. Rogercranstoun

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    I'm about to install a Neff T44T43N0 induction hob.

    As the worktop is granite, preventing the retaining clips to be fixed by screwing into the worktop aperture edge, they need to be fixed to this edge with a temperature resistant adhesive. The granite fitting company has stressed the need to use one which won’t creep into the granite grain and rise as a stain under the sealed surface around the edge of the hob. However, neither they or Neff are able to advise on any proprietary products that meet this situation.

    Grateful if anyone can point me in the right direction.
    :unsure:
     
  2. bernardgreen

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    We have had a Neff Domino ( two ring ) hob in a granite work top for 5 years without it being firmly fixed in place and without any sealant. It has not been a problem. The Domino has a silicon rubber seal around the edge, if you hob has this rubber seal then no other seal is needed.

    The hole was cut accurately so there is no sideways movement possible and the gravity holds the hob in place. ( this is NOT acceptable for a gas hob )

    I am installing Dominos in my new home ( into solid oak work top ) and the advice from Neff is to rely on the rubber seals and use NO additional sealant.
     
  3. ericmark

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    You say temperature resistant adhesive but really it will not get that hot. Even with a oil cooking thing like frying pan unlikely to exceed 100 degrees C. It is only the heat which transfers from pan so likely even standard silicon sealant will take that heat.
    If you really do need to stick down then ask the granite fitting company what can be used without heat consideration and select one. It is an induction hob and the whole point is heat is generated directly in the pan not in the hob. Not sure at what temperature a £5 will char but putting one under the pan of water and boiling it is a standard demonstration showing how cool the hob it's self stays.
     
  4. slup

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    My hob is just sat in the aperture using the rubber gasket that came with it. It's heavy enough to have never moved...
     
  5. EFLImpudence

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    Does the hob not have 'clamps' which screw to it (the hob) and merely pull/push on the worktop in a lever action.
     
  6. ban-all-sheds

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  7. mfarrow

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    Having installed a new hob this week (an Zanussi) I have to say that the spring clips around the outside were more than adequate to hold the hob in place by itself. As mentioned, as long as you have a seal of some sort under the lip of the hob then it shouldn't move around.

    As an aside, I found the old (gas) one was held in with bluetack :eek:
     
  8. mfarrow

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    Also this might be a stupid question but can't you diamond drill some holes in it? Then rawl plugs in and jobs a guddun?
     
  9. slup

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    What possible reason is there? Unless you're planning on turning your kitchen upside down, gravity is all you need!
     
  10. Rogercranstoun

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    Thanks for all these many replies so far.

    Being cautious not to invalidate the warranty, my concern has been whether the the unit's flanging above the line of the worktop has sufficient strength to support the combined weight of the unit's under-chassis and heavy cast iron, fully laden cookware.

    The manufacturer's installation is predicated on rails that have a profile similar to 2 Ls (1 upside down) joined together on their vertical strokes. The upside down part lips over the top edge of the worktop. The bottom L part of the rails incorporate V profiled clips that key into similar female profiles on the side of the under-chassis, thereby transferring the weigh load to the stronger part of the unit.

    The rails also function to centrally fix the unit within the worktop void. This void has been cut to provide a positioning gap of 1 mm on all sides.

    As to drilling and plugging, the granite suppliers are fearful the screwed tension will split the granite in that area.

    As matters stand, I'll check with Neff next week to see if the top flanging is strong enough and will post their comments.

    Many thanks so far for all comments.
     
  11. ericmark

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    Thank you for your reply. I will watch with interest. I think my new magnetic pans are lighter than old copper bottom ones. But as a stand alone unit this was not an issue.

    I have used a ceramic hob now for 25 years and the only problem has been jam making where the sugar eat into the surface. I had a replacement ceramic in loft with small chip for 23 years and never needed it.

    Likely now changed to induction I will need one. Some sod wrote a law to that effect! But will watch to see how it goes.
     
  12. slup

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    Mine is quite a different design - it has a stainless surround that comfortably takes the weight of the whole unit.

    I can see why you're concerned about your one as the weight of the hob and all the pans will not be insignificant and will be borne entirely by the glass rim.

    I would think that drilling the granite and inserting some kind of pins or threaded bushes would be the way to go. Anything that is going to expand inside the screw holes would strike me as a bad idea.

    Surely this is not the first time the granite people have come across this situation?

    Alternatively, can you not support the hob from underneath?
     
  13. Master of None

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    The glass rim around my induction hob supports the weight of the hob and everything on it and is installed to the MIs. In fact the MIs specifically say not to use adhesives or other fixings as the glass could crack due to expansion. Don't try this but I recon because its supported around the entire perimeter I could probably stand in the middle of it without it breaking. Toughened glass is very strong if you don't tap it on the edge with a hard object.
     

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