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Now scared of prosecution

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Firebreak, 9 Aug 2007.

  1. Firebreak

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    Hello,
    I have been out of the country for some time and on my return bought a house. Had a new bathroom fitted and in addition to replacing the ceiling light (which required moving the wiring into a 20amp junction box), I ran a spur from that junction box to another junction box. From this second box I connected two transformers for 2x50w 12v downlights in the shower cubical (lights were IP65 rated) and then the new ceiling was put up (which essentially prevents further access (except through the holes cut for the lights (the bathroom is an extension and above is the roof tiles). It looks great, works fine, however, having spent some time looking at this website I find things have changed since I have been away and I appear to have done something wrong installing bathroom lights. There appear to be 2005 regulations, which I am now finding out about (everything just said if in doubt consult an electrician and I wasn’t in doubt, just ignorant). If I get an electrician in to check the work how many regulations have I broken? Can they just check and certificate or will they report and am I going to get prosecuted? What can I do? Do I have to tear down my ceiling; I can't sleep at night, ironically not worried about electrics just the law.

    Help .. anyone
     
  2. RobFurn

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    Dont worry the regulations are non startory however the regulations may be used in a court of law in evidence to claim compliance with a statutory requirement.

    anyany if you call a spark in to put it right do you honestly think he will grass you up. To Who???? You are doing him a favour by employing him. Half of sparks work is putting stuff right. If your really worried just tell him you didnt do it or you had the builder in and they did it. Go to bed get some sleep By the way the current 2001 regulatons were amended in 2004 so I dont know where your getting 2005 from
     
  3. Firebreak

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    Thanks "RobFurn" that sounds like I might get some sleep. Still concerned that I might have done it wrong and they will have take the ceiling down (again) but at least I won't be in Jail! Got 2005 from somewhere that new regs came in on Jan 2005. Have to say that the "if in doubt.....) bit on packaging should state bathrooms and kitchens REQUIRE qualified electricians. I was just about to put spots into the kitchen and ended up on this site to look for fire regs when I came across the Bathroom spanner! Good site though (and the people are really nice ;) )
     
  4. RobFurn

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    Oh you will be taking about the Part P regs that came into play in Jan 2005 not the actual Brown bible of electrical regulations, sorry my bad should have realised. Yeah Part P Kitchens and bathrooms and other bits the DIYER cant do in the home. Yeah that is a legal thing and your going to Jail, Ha Ha only joking, seriously though work in bathrooms is not to be taken lightly so get a Spark in and explain your concerns.
     
  5. davy_owen_88

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    RobFurn, I believe the OP is talking about part P, which is statutory. You were meant to inform your building control office before you did the work and paid the fee. Now that the work has been done you might as well forget about it. If you feel that you are competent and that you followed the regulations regarding cable size/protective device/safe zones/bathroom zones/correct selection of fittings for bathrooms etc. then just put it out of your mind and remember to notify next time.

    If you intending on selling your house, you may have trouble because you will have to declare that electrical work has been done yet you will not have any certificates to prove it was done correctly. In this case a PIR is usually sufficient when the time comes anyway.

    Regardless of this, you will not be imprisoned for failure to notify the work. At the very most you might get a fine. ;)
     
  6. Firebreak

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    Thanks guys and who said Electricians didn't have a sense of humour. I almost fell off my chair when Rob quoted the "other, non legal" regs and that I was going to jail. Trust me your time has been well spent just for the punchline. Seriously thanks guys,
    by the way although not planning on selling soon only just bought, whats a PIR?
     
  7. davy_owen_88

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    Periodic Inspection Report - basically it will give you a run down of any problems within the electrical installation. If all things are fine most buyers will have no problem buying your house, even without the certificate for the original work.
     
  8. Adam_151

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    As long as it was more than 6 months ago, and the work isn't a deathtrap or anything, then the most it'll amount to is possibly a few minor hicups if you come to sell the place

    It works exactly the same as most minor traffic offences, the magistrates act requires it to be layed before a magistrates court within 6 months of the 'crime' being commited
     
  9. kevindgas

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    OP take no notice of this lot if you have done the work and are confident that it is safe just say it was done before the new (b**lshite) regs came in
    who apart from you will know
    this country is sinking from rules and regs that NO ONE is enforcing anyway!
     
  10. Steve

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    And if it was done in new colours? :confused:
     
  11. oohthatslive!!

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    new colurs came in 6 months before part p!!
     
  12. Firebreak

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    Actually I think it was done in the new colours (brown/blue?) but with the lights being off a 12V transformer and that is screwed to the roof beams 12 inches off the ceiling with the junction box mounted next door to it I think it would be impossible to actually check without taking the ceiling down or cutting a hatch in my nice new ceiling (no other real access).
    I agree with the regulations comments, as I now feel that I have to get an electrician in to change a bulb. I expect to pay good money to an experienced qualified tradesman to put in a fuse box or wiring for an immersion heater or outside power but to put a new light in the kitchen appears to be a bit excessive. I appreciate the fire risk but I don't get a chef round before I let the wife cook chips which if bloody guaranteed to start a fire . ( just joking dear :))
     

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