Olive removing tool

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by ptarling, 28 Sep 2006.

  1. Softus

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    I'm with micktheframer on this one....
     
  2. nickso

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    sharp hacksaw unless there is no room...then ill use the pinch type cutters and swear like buggery when it pinches the pipe :D
     
  3. Slugbabydotcom

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    Olive removing tools !

    Ya bunch of big pink frilly girlie things! I've got enough junk tools to cart about already.

    Easy does it with the hacksaw then stick a screwdriver in the slot and twist.

    Suppose if it got used often enough it might justify its existence, but I cant see one getting a place in my toy box
     
  4. sm1thson

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    I had to remove some olives for the first time at the weekend i just lightly gripped them with mold grips and twisted them off.
     
  5. Softus

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    Don't knock it 'til you've tried it. ;)
     
  6. frogmore

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    I've just fitted several new rads. Three of them were weeping. I drained down and fitted fresh PTFE tape and all but one of them is now fine.

    The problem one is reusing the old copper pipes to the rads and I left the old olives in place. If the weeping is slight, will they seal themselves or should I tighten up harder or must new olives be fitted? I really don't want to damage the pipes and have to replace them as access is very tricky. New carpet being laid next Weds so I need to sort this by then.

    Thanks
    David
     
  7. Waterworxsw

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    I'm with slugbaby, bunch of pansies :LOL:

    Intrigued to see how well the tools work though.

    Al
     
  8. EliteHeat

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    I've used all 3 methods, hacksaw, olive puller and olive splitter.

    I've just spent 50 quid on 15 & 22mm splitters and they are by far the best way of getting the olives off.

    Mind you, even better is just turning or wacking them off if they will let you.

    Dunno about them going blunt though - that's worrying :cry:

    P.S. I never managed to engage the nut on a 22mm pipe with the 15/22mm pullers.
     
  9. holty

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    im with waterworxsw on this one pump pliers or just plain old hacksaw. what next a soldering iron that can solder 15-28mm copper. :LOL:
     
  10. Softus

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    Indeedy-deedy. Pump pliers are great when you're bored and want to spend a few moments struggling and swearing. And a hacksaw is great for poking a dent in the skirting board and nicking the pipework.

    Or, you could buy a tool that gets off every olive, every time, quickly and neatly. Cutters/splitters work so well that it's almost disappointing.

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha. Is that a pile of cannelloni on the floor or have my sides just split?
     
  11. holty

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    if it saves me 15-20 quid on a tool. then every time i get the 20-30 pence olive off using my normal tools, then yes im happy as hapy can be.until my boss gives me money for tools then ill keep doing it the old way.p.s by the way softus i wasnt takin the p%^s about the soldering iron, you can actually buy them ;)
     
  12. Softus

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    In that case you should throw away all your tools except for a hacksaw, a hammer and a big screwdriver, because you could saw off every nut you find and do the new ones up by hitting them. That would be a big saving.

    My olive cutters have easily paid for themselves by saving time that I've turned into more earnings by being able to do more jobs in a day.
     
  13. holty

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    not arguing on this one, depends on the person, im always arguing with fellow tradesman on the subject if bending pipe is quicker than soldering and i cant understand how soldering is better or quicker. each to there own, its funny how different tradesperson have there own views on different tools or different ways.
     
  14. ollski

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    I bought both olive cutters but used them so rarely they went rusty, 90% of the time if pump pliers don't tease it off it will be crushed onto the pipe and need the section replacing anyway.
     
  15. Terrywookfit

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    I suppose there are tight arses in every walk of life!!

    I bought a 15mm splitter as I had 19 pairs of valves to change !!

    I would consider it paid for itself on that job alone due to saved time!!

    Its still working after 2 years!!

    If not abused they are excellent tools!!
     

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