1. We are pleased to announce the 'Home Automation' forum. Click here to get involved!

Preparation of Kitchen Flagstone Floor for Laying Lino

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by JWP, 14 Nov 2010.

  1. JWP

    JWP

    Joined:
    8 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    18
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I have been asked to prep a flagstone kitchen floor for laying lino.
    I was planning on getting away with laying 9mm ply to do this as the kitchen has the floor units in place.
    Was wondering what to use to fill the uneven areas, which I assume will be greater than 3mm over most of it.
    Would like to avoid screeding it totally, and thought that the ply would save me the trouble.
    Was planning on fixing it mechanically (screws&raw-plugs) but this is quite labour intensive. Any other suggestions?
     
  2. lymmranger

    Joined:
    2 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    611
    Thanks Received:
    67
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes - Dont do it

    I am not sure if this post is a wind up, or maybe your horse needs new shoes? Please pass the job onto someone who actually knows what they are doing.

    If you are determined to do this:

    The only correct way to do this is by screeding, to select the correct screed etc you need to know the following - does the existing floor have a DPM? Next what exactly do you mean by a "flagstone" floor?

    Finally please read some of the many existing posts asking exactly the same question just further look below this post
     
  3. JWP

    JWP

    Joined:
    8 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    18
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Lymmranger,

    Thanks for the response... I feal well and trully chastised, but appreciate the input. :oops:

    I'm sorry I haven't spent a lot of time scanning through all the postings. I actually do general property maintenance & repairs for a living and usually prefer kitchen fitting. I realise it was the wrong way to go, from a professional point of view, but as I've done quite a few uneven wood floors in bathrooms and kitchens before for laying lino, I thought I might try it and get away with it, but have never had to do a ground floor that is concrete/stone. :confused:

    The kitchen is actually in a house that a friend wishes to rent (so a freebie), and the landlord doesn't want to spend any money on it, but that's no excuse for cutting corners. :confused:

    I am always trying to add a new string to my bow, so would like to learn the correct way if you would care to "show me the light". :eek:

    The house is Victorian, but the kitchen appears to be older still. The Floor is actually large Purbeck stone tiles (irregular), maybe 2" thick. I would guess there is no DPM because of the possible age it was laid, but have no way of checking... so lets assume there is none.
    What would you suggest I should do around the kitchen units if I decide to use a self levelling compound, and which would be suitable for the situation I've described.
    Any help or a point in the right direction would be most appreciated... thanks!
    JWP :)
     
  4. StephenW

    Joined:
    9 Jul 2009
    Messages:
    272
    Thanks Received:
    40
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    If I was the landlord, and even if I didn't want to spend any money on it, I would be a bit peeved if someone covered my purbeck flagstone floor with resin or screed or even drilled a load of holes in it.
    At the end of the rental your friend might be asked to restore the floor to the current state. I'm sorry I don't know anything about the how-to's but I would be very cautious about doing it without the landlord's written consent even if I was an expert.
     
  5. JWP

    JWP

    Joined:
    8 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    18
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks Stephen...
    Actually the landlord doesn't mind what is done internally... he effectively gave cart-blanche to do anything they wanted, and prefers long-lets... last guy was in it 50 yrs, until he died recently... but I appreciate the heads up.
     
  6. lymmranger

    Joined:
    2 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    611
    Thanks Received:
    67
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    mmm I was a bit grumpy this morning, sorry :oops:

    ..given the extra info you are now in a dilema, It will need screeding before you consider vinyl flooring.
    BUT that will trash the existing floor are you sure the landlord is ok with that?
    The existance of a DPM is difficult to judge, an experienced fitter can usually tell,but without moisture meters you can only guess! clues like the room smelling damp and moisture in/on the floor can help but are not "smoking gun" type evidence. There are liquid DPM`s on the market, but I am a retailer not a fitter so I would be uncomfortable recomending a specific product without seeing the job. The screed should be a latex based one, be aware that again you should technically use a primer first! (costs are racking up quick now arent they)

    I suppose that your methodology will also be influenced by how much money the parties are prepared to spend

    I would be tempted to get your local retailer in, they will quote you a price to do the job and should discuss the pros and cons of rectifying the floor, it may even work out cheaper to let them do it all for you.
    By doing this you will at least know what products are required should you decide to do it yourself.
    The age of the kitchen leaves you no choice but to screed up to it, it will do no harm
    hopefully matty or mac will notice this thread and jump in too (think crazy dave is a retailer )
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  7. JWP

    JWP

    Joined:
    8 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    18
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The cost implications are of concern whatever ends up being done.
    The rest of the house needs a lot of work to make it comfortably habitable (old guy did nothing for 50yrs), so it's not just the floor that's got to come out of their budget!

    On the bright side... it appears the old kitchen has been ripped out, and if a decision to take the property can be made before the new kitchen is fitted by the landlord... their wouldn't be the need to work around the units! :p

    Have just looked at the new kitchen layout. Floor area is just under 11M^2.

    Although you haven't suggested what products to use, how much would be needed of primer and screed to do the job (I guess it depends on the products?).
    What I'm really trying to find is an early ball-park figure for the raw materials, so that I know if I need to get them to sit down before getting them depressed at the rising figure of work needed to be done to the property!:(
    JWP
     
  8. crazydaze

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2009
    Messages:
    695
    Thanks Received:
    104
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Personally I would suggest that this particular situation must be judged by a pro on-site,it sounds like the first thing to do is moisture check the floor with a hydrometer NOT a damp meter with pin's, once you know the moisture reading's, you can look on F-Ball or Ardex websites and help lines and all the information will be there/available as to what barrier and screeding products are recommended. I would suggest you are definately looking at a DPM application and AT LEAST two layers of screed, rectifying a floor like this effectively takes seasoned skill and experience, it's a costly process in both materials and labour/time. Prepping this style of floor for vinyl, linoleum or LVT is expensive, there are no short cuts. Get it wrong and the whole lot will lift and be wasted in a few weeks.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  9. JWP

    JWP

    Joined:
    8 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    18
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks Crazydaze...

    I'll go back with all this info and see where we go from there.

    A big Thank you to everybody for all the input! :D

    Gratefully,
    JWP :cool:
     
  10. lymmranger

    Joined:
    2 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    611
    Thanks Received:
    67
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    ...If the Landlord has ripped out the kitchen

    .....maybe he will sort out the floor :LOL:

    (oh and cheers crazydave)
     

Share This Page