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RECENT C & G 2382 question

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by ebee, 30 Mar 2011.

  1. ebee

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    no i got some questions wrong not just one or two
     
  2. EFLImpudence

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    Is it Michael?
     
  3. ban-all-sheds

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    No - it's B.

    B gets you to Table 54.8, and 54.8 tells you that you might need a different size than the ones in the table if the local DNO says so.

    So that covers off all of the concerns that D might be the right answer because in theory the DNO make the final call - choosing B means recognising that the DNO might require something special.


    Then WTF did you answer D? :rolleyes:


    No - BS 7671, in Table 54.8, tells us that for these supply neutral sizes you use a minimum of those main bonding conductor sizes, but that the local distributor's network conditions may require a larger conductor.

    The DNO would not be "overruling" B - B is the answer which means "use the values from the table unless the DNO say otherwise".


    Yes you can because Table 54.8 tells you that the DNO may have overriding requirements and therefore to size your main bonding cable "in accordance with" 54.8 (the wording in the question, please note) you'll be selecting it in accordance with the fact that the DNO might have their own requirements and that therefore unless you know they don't you should contact them.


    And so on and so forth to everyone who thinks that D is the answer because the DNO might require a non-standard value.


    dingbat is absolutely right - just read what is in front of you.


    But this is not the first time, even today, and nor will it be the last, that I've encountered a truly mind-boggling inability to simply read what's written.

    And those 50% of tutors who got it wrong?

    They can't read either. There's nothing wrong with the question - the source of their confusion and the cause of their failure is their poor reading ability.
     
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  4. ebee

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    "ebee wrote:
    It really was a question I got last month in the exam so I answered D ... I knew they wanted B.

    Then WTF did you answer D? icon_rolleyes.gif"

    'cos I'm an awkward git :D .

    And I still say D/ because the question does not mention the note as an exception. Therefore you can only determine the size after you have consulted them not before. Poorly worded question I says.

    If I answered the question in a way that I believe is wrong (even if that belief is 100% deluded & insane) would you have more respect for my answer than if I deliberately answered it as I believe is wrong just to receive an extra mark?
     
  5. ebee

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    No it's not, but I'm not giving the answer until I see someone give the answer that Tarant's lot gave or the answer the answer I gave and I also have removed the temporary ban on BAS answering just to give others chance to catch up (Central Line - I did not see that one coming! :LOL: )
     
  6. dingbat

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    Halle-bleedin'-lujah! :D
     
  7. holmslaw

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  8. ebee

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    "Exactly the same as giving someone a restaurant menu with a note at the top saying, 'The prices on this menu may increase when we make up your bill, please confirm price before ordering" ie as with table 54.8 the menu prices are meaningless."

    Nice one Holmslaw.

    I see no one has answered the circle question so I'll lift the Ban on ban (Bet he knows the answer)

    :p
     
  9. echoes

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    Go on, I'll take the bait - put us out of our misery....!

    The diameter of a circle separates the circle into two parts of equal area.

    What were the other options?

    Disclaimer: I know that wasn't the exact question. It is not the only line which will do this.
     
  10. Stoday

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    Wrong!

    A circle does not posess an area. It encloses an area. Perhaps you are thinking of a disc?

    Another example of a badly drafted question. Maybe it should have read What separates the circumference of a circle into two equal lengths?

    .
     
  11. ebee

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    Diameter,
    good answer,
    very good answer.
    It was in fact the answer they were looking forand one of the choices of 4 given.

    It's wrong though.
    LOL.

    Any line intersecting an arc (including a circle) in two places is a "Chord".
    The chord of that particular question would have a length equal to the diameter of that circle (between its intersecting points)

    But the question they asked was the "Name" of the line not the "length" of it.
     
  12. mikhailfaradayski

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    D is just wrong, wrong, diddly-wrong-wrong.

    Its B, taken from 544.1.1 second paragraph.

    simples, bosh, done, end of, JD, next question.....

    Its definately not the diameter, thats a description of the largest measurement between two points on the circumference of a circle.

    Lets try 'the bisect', whats the prize? :cool:
     
  13. Robgers

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    Line of symmetry?
     
  14. holmslaw

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  15. JohnW2

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    Goodness, what on earth are we doing discussing semantics again in an 'Electrics' forum? :)

    Anyway, I'm afraid you are wrong. As well as being the length of the chord which passes through the centre, "diameter" is also the name of that line. The OED defines "diameter" as (amongst other things) "Straight line passing from side to side of any body or figure through the centre". "Diameter" is therefore a perfectly correct answer to the question.

    In passing, note that is doesn't only apply to circles, nor even only to 2-D figures - which is something that many people don't realise.

    Kind Regards, John
     

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