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speed up plaster drying

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by vik2001, 13 Nov 2009.

  1. vik2001

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    ive had my room plastered, its almost dry, but certain areas around window is not drying up due to the weather i believe... im getting my wardrobes fitted and needed to paint walls before then. is there anything i can do to help dry up these specific patches of plaster which is still wet....

    its been 10 days now....
     
  2. Richard C

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    Generally not a good idea to artificially rush it as you could end up with cracks. A skim will usually be dry & ready to paint after 10-14 days if the room has background heat & good ventilation; a new base coat & skim will take up to 4 weeks. Was it just a skim over existing plaster or new base & skim? Assuming there was no damp previously, it may be down to cold spots around the window. You shouldn’t paint over it until it’s fully dry either or you could get problems with the paint finish.

    If it was just skimmed, you may be able to paint the walls where the wardrobes are going if they are dry but I would leave the damp bits around the window until they have a chance to fully dry out. If it’s a full base coat & skim, it could take up to 4 weeks or even longer as I said. If you paint walls that still have a high moisture content (even though they may look dry) & cover them with wardrobes you could end up with damp musty smells, damage your new wardrobes & your clothes!
     
  3. vik2001

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    thanks rich
    some areas were bonded where required and skimmed, other areas were just skimmed alone...
    i let it dry naturally, be on safe side
     
  4. maaaaaaaaat

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    youve got moisture coming in from outside,or your windows
     
  5. noseall

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    10 days in a heated room is a long time to still be drying out.

    It is likely to be condensation or a leak.
     
  6. maaaaaaaaat

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    and also let me tell you plaster sets and dries in a few days in a lived in house, rc is talking ,,,,.....,.,.
     
  7. noseall

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    and also let me tell you plaster sets and dries in a few days in a lived in house, rc is talking ,,,,.....,.,.[/quote]

    It is likely Richard was referring to inherent moisture and not the visual darkened state of wet plaster.
     
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  8. Richard C

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    Your first post made a lot of sense (with info I had already advised) but I really don’t know why you thought it necessary to make it personal on the second :confused: . Plaster might appear to be dry in your “world” but if knew the trade, you would not have posted as you did. :LOL:
     

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