What oil for my reclaimed Pine Victoian internal doors?

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by rossyl, 26 Oct 2010.

  1. rossyl

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    Hi,

    I'm getting some reclaimed internal Victorian doors. I will leave them in their natural wood, but would like to oil them to give them a healthy glow and nice colour.

    I believe that they will all be Pine, and do not know if, but imagine, they were "dipped".

    I've had a look and seen linseed, tung and teak oils recommended. But Have no real idea on the finish that they will give.

    I'd be most grateful for your response.

    Thanks,
    R
     
  2. geraldthehamster

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    For pine doors I'd use a good quality wax polish, like Fiddes. Oils are more intended for hardwoods, I think. Wax will give the doors a slightly golden hue, and a soft sheen.

    You can put linseed oil into a pine door but it's liable to darken the colour. I used it on some doors in a previous house and got a golden brown (and applied wax polish once the oil and soaked in and dried off); however, on a similar-looking door that I was about to fit in my new house, linseed turned it a dark muddy brown and I was unable to use the door.

    So I'd say wax polish on its own is sufficient. But buy the good stuff that furniture restorers use, not the rubbish from the sheds.

    Cheers
    Richard
     
  3. rossyl

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  4. geraldthehamster

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  5. geraldthehamster

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    I've put some pictures of two of my recently waxed doors here:

    http://oscarthecat.fotopic.net/p67858234.html
    http://oscarthecat.fotopic.net/p67858236.html

    The product was Fiddes Supreme. I think this comes in different tints; the stuff I used says "light wax" on the label, and turns the pale wood a bit more golden. I also think they've probably changed the formulation in the ten years since I bought my big tin, that I've still not finished, but I expect it still turns out the same results. The exact colour you end up with will depend on your timber. I'd go for it.

    Personally I apply one coat, leave for maybe 20 minutes, then buff off, apply another coat and leave for as long as possible to go hard before a final buffing. The instructions now might vary and I'm sure other people do this differently.
    '
    Cheers
    Richard
     
  6. mointainwalker

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    Seeing a theme there in your usernames , Richard. How many other species do you post as ? :D

    How often do you find it necessary to re-wax ?
     
  7. geraldthehamster

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    Greetings. Only two species, to date ;)

    It's more a case of how often I can be bothered to re-wax. Doors I waxed three years ago are still passable, apart from the inside of a couple on bathrooms that could really do with another polish. Having said that, you can't beat the lustre of a newly-waxed door. How often do you re-wax?

    Cheers
    Richard
     
  8. mointainwalker

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    Do not currently have any waxed items. Doors are stained but looking at oyher wood items like book shelves etc.

    Are there any non-obvious reasons why that's not a good idea and any types of wood that don't take wax well ?

    EDIT Sorry. just realised may have pirated thread, apologies OP
     
  9. geraldthehamster

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    Dunno, but presumably there's a reason why people use wax for softwoods and oils for hardwoods.

    I've yet to meet a piece of pine that didn't benefit from furniture wax. I even rescued an old stained pine bookcase, that the previous occupant of my house (a joiner) had made for one of his children, then relegated to the shed where he'd nailed it to the wall to hold shed stuff. Spilt paint sanded off it, a bit more stain rubbed on and two coats of wax, and it looked lovely again, in a shabby kind of way.

    I'd probably use a more durable finish (ie varnish) on pine that was going to be frequently subjected to moisture. Can't see any reason not to use it on your bookcases.

    Cheers
    Richard
     
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  10. rossyl

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    hi guys...

    hoping for a bit of quick advice...i need to decide on the product to finish my doors by Monday morning!

    They are old pine doors that have been dipped. they have many little imperfections, and so a little bits of filler here and there.

    given that what would be best - a stain and then a wax?

    with regard to wax - I've head a lot about Briwax P7 being a good colour. But stain...no idea.

    Thanks


    [​IMG]
     
  11. geraldthehamster

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    Go back and read what I said to you before, look at the photos, and see if they are what you are aiming for. If so, Fiddes Supreme, Light Wax is all that you need.

    And you might want to sand them first.

    Cheers
    Richard
     
  12. rossyl

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    Hi Richard,

    The light wax I think might be too light. But I've no doubt Fiddes is a good wax.

    I've pretty much decided on Briwax as so many pine door strippers/refurbishers use it - and in Brown P7. The finish is slightly darker to your photos.

    If your interested the following have indicated they use Briwax
    - Stoneage Architectural, which is where I bought the doors(featured on Tommy Walsh's shows no less!)
    - Old Pine Company
    - http://www.woodendoors.co.uk/product_details/3208.asp

    this was also an interesting read: http://www.doorshed.co.uk/decorating_your_door
     
  13. geraldthehamster

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