when and where to apply stabilizer?

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by donmaico, 21 Oct 2010.

  1. donmaico

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    I prepared a south facing wall with a view to applying stabiliser and 3 coats of exterior quality paint as advised by a builder.I then went down to Brewers to buy some told the retailer what i wanted it for and he gtursn round and strongly advises not to put stabilizer on bare brickwork as it will all come off in 6 months time together with whatever paint I apply over it.He said it was the most common mistake made. e suggested applying exterior primer on the bare areas and stabiliser on the rest.
    Thing its a previously painted surface but about 30-40 % of its is now either bare brick or partially bare brick .Anwyay i emailed Sandtex and they sent me an adobe reader and i read this:

    "New surfaces All surfaces must be sound, suitably dry and free from anything that will interfere with the
    adhesion of the materials to be applied. Surfaces with suction (porous surfaces) should be
    treated with an application of Sandtex Trade Water Borne Stabilising Solution.
    Undecorated surfaces
    All surfaces must be sound, suitably dry and free from anything that will interfere with the
    adhesion of the materials to be applied."

    this suggests to me that it is ok to apply stabiliser to bare bricks

    So who is right? I have already painted some primer on some of the bare areas .Should I continue and then apply sabiliser over the whole lot? thanks
     
  2. johnheritage

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    I'm not an expert on stabilizers, but I think Sandtex may be using the word to mean their primers.

    Stabilizer as it's sold from painting places is usually used on surfaces where they continually have a layer of dust on them, that the will allow the paint to fall back off. The stabilizer binds the dust to the surface and lets the paint stick.

    I'd go with a primer designed to go straight on bare brick and forget the cans labeled as stabilizers. I've used exterior masonry paint on new rendering and not had any problems and I've watched guys painting entire houses not using cans of stabilizers, producing a very nice result that lasts.

    I go on about them so much someone will soon assume I'm working for them, but I'm not. Toolstation.com carries exterior primer and overcoat in big, cheap, effective tins. Order over £10's worth and it'll be delivered the next morning for free.
     
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  3. donmaico

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    maybe its more for rendered areas which have become dusty.I cant say the bricks here are although some of the pointing is getting a bit so
    .in fact I had to have some replaced it was so bad.
    What alarmed me was the rertailer telling me the whole lot would fall off if used stabiliser on bare bricks,Anyway i'll stick with primer for now and then go over the whole lot with 3 topcoats
     
  4. johnheritage

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    In terms of dusty, it's easy to confuse the word.

    The kind of dust they mean is like a chalk board, where you can wipe your hand over it and it'll be covered. Then it'll reappear again over time.

    For a guy in a shop to be trying to NOT sell you something, he is probably trying to help based on experience. And a rare thing.

    For brickwork and mortar, the dustyness isn't so bad, that's more like bits of grit and the paint will bind over that. It's when the ENTIRE surface is constantly covered in fine, reappearing dust that you've got problems; there's nothing solid for ANY of the paint to stick to.

    Artists have the same problem with things they draw or make with graphite pencils, carbon sticks, chalks and so on. The stuff will smear and it will gradually come away. So they can buy fixing agent to spray over it. It's like a transparent, low gloss lacquer / varnish / glue basically, that sticks all the trillions of tiny bits of dust in place.

    If you use a primer and follow the precise directions, and it fails, you can always ask for a refund. Take an up close photo of the brickwork prior to putting it on as evidence of the surface it's gone onto.
     
  5. donmaico

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    the primer I am using is oil based primer sealer made by Albany which apparently has exceptional binding qualities.Thanks any way, i will do as you suggested
     

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