1. We are pleased to announce the 'Home Automation' forum. Click here to get involved!

Where is the white gloss that doesn't yellow?

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by attractivebrunette, 26 Dec 2009.

  1. attractivebrunette

    Joined:
    10 May 2008
    Messages:
    185
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    There is another thread on this topic but it's 4 years old.

    My house is very dark inside and gets hardly any natural light. I've been told this is something that causes white gloss paint to 'yellow'.

    However I can't re-paint all my doors and frames once a year (that's how long it's taken for my pure brilliant white gloss dulux trade paint to turn yellow).

    I've heard there are some white gloss paints that dont' yellow, one being Dulux Trade Aquatech. But some people say it's a bitch to get on and off and dries too quickly and simply isn't as good as normal oil based gloss paints.

    Can anyone tell me what the deal is? I want some tough, hard-wearing trade brilliant white gloss that won't yellow. Is Aquatech any good? Any others?
     
  2. LJW61

    Joined:
    1 Mar 2009
    Messages:
    481
    Thanks Received:
    63
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The reason oil-based paint yellows is due to the linseed oil oxidising - same way a cricket bat gets darker with age ...
    Aquatech is water-based , it wont yellow but its c*** as far as application & durability goes.. :evil:
    Stick to oil-based but why not paint the woodwork a slightly off-white eggshell to start with?
     
  3. JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    38,354
    Thanks Received:
    1,533
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    you don't smoke or use candles, do you?
     
  4. vernerbongo2

    Joined:
    5 Mar 2008
    Messages:
    176
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Antrim
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    As far as I can see all oil based white yellows after time, I agree with the other man water based is the only answer but its not as hard wearing and I think its Harder to put on as it dries very quick :eek:
     
  5. JonB

    Joined:
    9 Apr 2005
    Messages:
    590
    Thanks Received:
    24
    Location:
    Cleveland
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    We used (about 9years ago) B&Q Low Odour white gloss which did not yellow , a pal enquired at B&Q for the same paint & was told it is now called B&Q magic gloss or similar.
    JonB
     
  6. opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    1,691
    Thanks Received:
    187
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It is true that all oil based paint will yellow due to the ultraviolet light- not a problem for water (edit) based paint.

    Over the last couple of years I have noticed that the Dulux Trade gloss has been yellowing faster than I would expect. The same does not seem to be true for the DT oil based eggshell. No idea why though- 95% of my jobs are eggshell so I am being very anecdotal

    I too would recommend eggshell (off white- eg natural cotton)- faster (touch) drying, much nicer to work with as well, less scrubbable though
     
  7. DuluxTrade2010

    Joined:
    15 Dec 2009
    Messages:
    3
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Oil based paints are susceptible to a certain level of ‘yellowing’, so using a water-based system is the best way to ensure paintwork stays looking freshly painted for longer.

    Dulux Trade Aquatech is no longer available, however water-based Ecosure Gloss and Undercoat have been launched which are easy to apply and will achieve the hardwearing and professional looking finish normally associated with solvent-based products. Ecosure products are also a more environmentally friendly choice compared to the solvent-based equivalent, with lower VOC content and less CO2 emitted during the manufacturing process.

    To get the best from the Ecosure Gloss system:
    * Use a synthetic brush
    * Lightly dampen both the brush and the surface before application to increase the flow out
    * Apply two coats of gloss for a glossier finish

    See here for more information - http://www.icipaints.co.uk/products/ecosure/ecosure_gloss_undercoat.jsp

    For an eggshell finish, I recommend Dulux Trade Diamond Eggshell or Ecosure Quick Drying Eggshell. Both paints are water-based and offer exceptional durability credentials.

    Diamond Eggshell - http://www.icipaints.co.uk/products/info/dulux_trade_diamond_eggshell.jsp
    Ecosure QD Eggshell - http://www.icipaints.co.uk/products/ecosure/ecosure_quick_drying_eggshell.jsp

    Nicolas Guichard, Senior Brand Manager Dulux Trade
     
  8. opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    1,691
    Thanks Received:
    187
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi Nick

    Glad to see input from the masters. I used to use the dulux trade forum- shame it went. IMHO the technical support was superior to the phone support.

    Would you be willing to add your comments to the following when you get a mo.?

    http://www.diynot.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=204643

    Thanks
     
  9. DuluxTrade2010

    Joined:
    15 Dec 2009
    Messages:
    3
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hello Opps,

    Thanks for pointing me towards the thread about VOC compliant paints. In fact, this is one that I had spotted already and posted a reply on 15th December. If you have further questions on this subject though, post again and I’d be happy to add another comment.

    Thanks again!

    Nicolas Guichard, Senior Brand Manager Dulux Trade
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  10. opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    1,691
    Thanks Received:
    187
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Sorry Nicolas, I missed your post- thanks for it.

    I notice that your link explains that the new (oil-based) paints will yellow faster than previously. I appreciate that you (Dulux) were forced to make changes to the paints but I have never understood why UV inhibitors are not included in the paint or as a optional top coating in the first place.
     
  11. LJW61

    Joined:
    1 Mar 2009
    Messages:
    481
    Thanks Received:
    63
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    If you come over to take a look in the Bib n Braces forum you'll see that we're not impressed by water-based gloss/eggshell, it doesnt perform anywhere near as good as oil/solvent-based products :(
    As for yellowing, Im having no end of customers calling me back to explain why their recently (VOC2010)painted woodwork is yellowing so quickly, sometimes noticable within 6-8 weeks!
    Frankly this VOC stuff is causing us problems (all brands , this isnt a Dulux only issue)finacially as we're blamed for supplying the paint & some clients are requesting re-painting !
    I tend to disagree about UV light , Its lack of sunlight that accelerates the yellowing, an example; On a recent job I had to paint four kitchen doors, I returned for more work there last week, one door had a hook on it where the owner had hung a (DRY) apron , when this was removed an exact yellow 'shadow' of the apron was distinctly visible ,the rest of the door was as white as could be expected when exposed to light. Weve all seen this effect inside cupboard doors ..
    b] lwdcourt's[/b] mention of adding blue is a valid one, thats the difference between 'white' & 'Brilliant White', just look at the blue tint to washing powders, they use the same 'method'
     
  12. opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    1,691
    Thanks Received:
    187
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi, whilst not wanting to dismiss your suggestion out of hand I don't see how blue paint would work.

    To begin with the yellowing is because of the absence of a particular part of the UV spectrum.

    Exterior paint should not yellow unless it is deprived of the UV light.

    AFAIK it is not the driers that result in yellowing but the medium itself, particularly things like linseed oil. This has been the case for hundreds of years, just look at old p(artist) aintings.

    Brilliant white already has a small amount of blue added, without the blue it is plain old BS White (00E55).

    Additionally blue paint (yellows/darkens)- if I paint a cupboard, the internal colour will end up darker than the exterior...

    Sorry- you might be correct but I can't see how or why.
     
  13. LJW61

    Joined:
    1 Mar 2009
    Messages:
    481
    Thanks Received:
    63
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    No, youre right opps, I didnt mean it stopped yellowing, I just meant it appeared 'more white' at first application. As you say all shades of paint will yellow after time (unless sun-bleached)
     
  14. opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    1,691
    Thanks Received:
    187
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    opps- you beat me to it.....

    Haven't you noticed that post VOC2010 paints in the tin even yellow, eg if you have a tin that is half full the bit clinging to the upper sides or lid are yellowed in weeks.

    I now recommend customers to go for off whites rather than white so that the yellowing is less obvious.

    The maths behind VOC reduction don't add up- surfaces will be painted more often- I use more driers, Owatrol and white spirit than before and I am using more Acid Cat than previously.

    Daft....
     
  15. opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    1,691
    Thanks Received:
    187
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi LJW

    My response was to the other (conspiracy :?: ) fellow not you- out of sync- story of my life...
     

Share This Page