1. We are pleased to announce the 'Home Automation' forum. Click here to get involved!

WIll this Purdy brush set be suitable for all my needs???

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by MaxDread, 21 Mar 2012.

  1. MaxDread

    Joined:
    8 Sep 2010
    Messages:
    406
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi all

    Having helped me with primer, top coat, filler and all manner of other stuff - here I am again for a little advice on what brushes to get. I've only ever used cheap and nasties, so I'm quite excited to try something decent. I'm looking at this set:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Purdy-Monarch-Elite-Pro-Extra-Paint/dp/B005ATZVHS/ref=pd_sim_sbs_diy_1

    and wondered if they will be enough for all the following jobs that I have lined up for the year:

    - WB primer/undercoat and WB Satin on internal trimming in the house (windows, door frames, etc)
    - Painting our wooden staircase. Not sure yet whether I will use WB or OB on the stairs. Would they be ok for OB?
    - Emulsion on walls
    - Painting external windows/front door. Again, not sure if I will use WB or OB yet.
    - Applying oil finish to oak doors (although I guess I could use a rag for that)
    - Painting a concrete floor

    That's all I can think of for now!

    So, which jobs will the brushes be suitable for - and will the set give me enough brushes to do ALL the jobs if I clean well between uses and store well?

    Huge thanks

    Max

    (PS - sorry to hog the forum with so many questions - I promise to shut up and get on with the job soon).
     
  2. emilybronte

    Joined:
    19 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    978
    Thanks Received:
    118
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Don't use synthetic brushes for oil-based paints.

    Don't waste Purdy brushes on a garage floor.
     
  3. MaxDread

    Joined:
    8 Sep 2010
    Messages:
    406
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    What would be the downside? Seems that some people say it is OK (and the manufacturer says "for all paints") but then others say don't use them....

    That's gonna be our kitchen floor! But fair play, I realised after I posted that that was a stupid thing for me to ask and that any old brush will do for that.

    Many thanks for the reply, much appreciated

    Max
     
  4. dcdec

    Joined:
    14 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    1,403
    Thanks Received:
    398
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    A natural bristle brush is best for oil based paints but that brush set is fine for both acrylics and oils. It is a good idea to try and keep them seperate ie once you've used a brush for oil based keep it for oil.
    The purdys are a very good all round brush and cope well with WB and OB paints. When painting with WB satin for trim its a good idea to dampen the brush to stop the paint from drying on the brush up towards the ferrule.

    If you've got a lot of painting to do you may want to consider a brushmate 4 for storing your oil based brushes.

    Agree with Emily that i wouldn't use a decent brush on a floor but must admit i've never painted a floor.
     
  5. emilybronte

    Joined:
    19 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    978
    Thanks Received:
    118
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes, that's what I meant and why I advised against the Purdys he is after,as they are synthetic. I think it's something to do with how the paint sits on the filaments/bristles, or something (she said, vaguely). I usually invest in a decent Hamilton for oil-based, then keep it for one colour.

    Absolutely, but get one of the smaller ones (about £20) not the massive one at £60 odd. I decorate full time, but I still don't need a big Brushmate! It was a waste of money and space as I don't do that much o/b work. Does anyone want to buy it? £30? Will deliver anywhere within 50 mile radius of Leeds or Newcastle!

    Well, I've painted a garage floor (and nearly lost the will to live, I can tell you), but it was so mind-numbingly boring and cold I have no recollection of what I used to apply the paint with. It could have been the cat's tail for all I can remember. Big rough roller? 6" bristle brush like an old fashioned wallpaper brush?
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  6. dcdec

    Joined:
    14 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    1,403
    Thanks Received:
    398
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Have to say i've been using purdys for years and they've always been fine in oil, i do prefer a natural bristle but as i'm doing more WB finishes now i think its better to stick with the purdys as they can cope with either. I'm sure they wear faster than they used to though.
     
  7. JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    38,349
    Thanks Received:
    1,533
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    you can do a garage floor with a soft broom. No kneeling down required.
     
  8. misterhelpful

    Joined:
    19 Feb 2011
    Messages:
    2,039
    Thanks Received:
    392
    Location:
    Ohio (formerly Mid Glamorgan)
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I agree that natural bristle brushes are preferable for gloss. I can't seem to get the same finish with synthetics - perhaps it's just something to do with my wrist action (ahem :oops: ).

    Roller on a pole for garage/concrete floors is what I tend to use.
     
  9. MaxDread

    Joined:
    8 Sep 2010
    Messages:
    406
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yet again some very helpful advice and tips. Thanks to you all.

    Seeing as these are just for home use (and once we are done decorating I might not use them again for some time) I think I will go with the 5 pack of Purdys and use them for WB and OB, but not mix them up - have some for one and some for the other. Even if not perfect, it will be tonnes better than the crap I've used before.....


    I might add a sash brush into the mix to have a go with that, bringing the tally up to 6 brushes. Not sure what size sash to get if only getting one...

    That might leave a couple more though, namely:

    1. A small 0.5" or 1" brush. These don't seem too popular. But I've been looking at my old brushes and realise now that I used to use a 0.5" quite often for doing tricky parts of trim (like where the door frame meets the wall, etc.). Does anyone else use these small brushes? If not, how easy is it to use bigger brushes for smaller sections of trim.

    2. The reason I asked about a 4" above (or maybe even bigger).... Does anyone ever use brushes nowadays for emulsion on walls? I've got a very small WC and a small bathroom to paint and was thinking of doing them with a brush. I like rollers but I find the clean up real tricky, they waste paint, and I'm not that good with them. Plus it's more stuff to buy! But what would be the downside of using a 4"+ brush.

    Your thoughts as ever would be most appreciated.

    Cheers

    Max
    [/i]
     
  10. misterhelpful

    Joined:
    19 Feb 2011
    Messages:
    2,039
    Thanks Received:
    392
    Location:
    Ohio (formerly Mid Glamorgan)
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I've got a number of sash brushes in various sizes but generally tend to use the 18mm and 25mm more than any others. They clean up wonderfully and, considering that I use them for all sorts of water based paint jobs, never seem to wear away.

    The only times I use ½" brushes are for awkward nooks and crannies, behind pipes, etc., as it's far easier to cut in with a good quality 2" brush where the architrave meets the wall. It probably doesn't seem so to the DIYer, but you have far more control over a bigger brush than a small one.

    As for larger brushes on walls, with practice, you can get a much better finish than with a roller but it can be a daunting task as brush marks will show if you apply the paint too thickly/unevenly. It is much more time consuming too, which is why rollers are generally the preferred method within the trade.
     
  11. oldgreymouse

    Joined:
    5 Mar 2012
    Messages:
    156
    Thanks Received:
    32
    Location:
    Gloucestershire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Max, have you considered using the smaller 4 inch hand rollers? these are reasonable priced and I use these for the smaller rooms or short walls using a paint container called a 'Pelican' holder from the Wooster company. Bought it about 4 or 5 years ago and it has plastic liners.
    B & Q have something very similar. It holds a good volume of paint, and has a magnetic part to hold a brush for any cutting in.
    I keep two of these holders on my van along with about 5 or 6 liners used for different paints. I hardly ever use paint kettles now.

    If you do want to try using a brush for a smaller room rather than a roller, you may find anything bigger than a 4" brush a bit unwieldy if you are not used to them, again as you have been advised above, choose a good quality brush and this will hold a good amount of paint, add a little water to emulsion paints if they get a bit sticky or dry too quick as you work with them.

    For the finer work around small window panes such as in multi pane glass doors, I started using very soft artist brushes that I buy in one of our superstores in the art section at about £3 each. They are just over an inch wide and come with very long 12" handles. These are so soft that they leave no brush marks and since finding them have never gone back to my old sash brushes, even used them on Friday to paint an outside wall with Sandtex between two downpipes that no ordinary brush would fit through!!
     
  12. deanibusmaximus

    Joined:
    15 Dec 2010
    Messages:
    81
    Thanks Received:
    17
    Location:
    Wiltshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I use brushes on walls quite often in very old properties as it gives a more authentic period look.

    I use purdy monarch elite synthetics for everything including oil based baints.

    Even my labourer can get a glass smooth finish with purdys & oil based paints, but then he has a very good teacher. :LOL:
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1

Share This Page