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Thermostatic mixer shower...


 
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paul78

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 9:51 pm Reply with quote

When fitting a thermostatic shower off a combi system are the hot/cold feeds just branched of the bath hot/cold pipes??

And if fed off a gravity system can you just tee off the bath pipes again?? (making sure the mixer is suitable 1st that is)

Just heard contradicting advice today on them so thought id check opinions of you guys

advice much appreciated.
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seco services

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 9:55 pm Reply with quote

Combi then branch off existing hot/cold.
Gravity system then i always use dedicated supply from cws and cylinder.
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shagty

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 10:21 pm Reply with quote

This advice was probably relating to the pipework serving the shower valve.

Stable temperature control on showers with low pressure (gravity) water supplies is dependent on the water source. Shared connections will cause pressure fluctuations and unstable temperature, while dedicated connections can overcome this condition.

Dedicated connections involve running pipes directly from the CWS cistern and cylinder on such storage systems. Using shared connections on a gravity shower in a home with a few or more occupants can lead to problems.

Whereas combi systems generally operate at higher water pressures and the effects of shared connections is considerably reduced.

Hope this clear thing up a bit icon_smile.gif
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cantaloup63

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 10:26 pm Reply with quote

In what circumstances would a pro install a pre-mixer (anti-scald) blender?
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paul78

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 10:47 pm Reply with quote

seco thanks i know what you mean with the dedicated feed to the mixer, what would be the negatives if the mixer wasnt supplied with its own feed and just branched of the hot/cold pipes to the bath or basin...

thanks
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seco services

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 10:52 pm Reply with quote

pressure/flow fluctuations and unstable temperature.
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paul78 (30 Nov 2011)
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shagty

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 10:59 pm Reply with quote

cantaloup63 wrote:
In what circumstances would a pro install a pre-mixer (anti-scald) blender?


For non-domestic plumbing applications in healthcare/childcare projects, anti-scald measures are required. For domestic projects where vulnerable people have access to the plumbing system, anti-scald measures would be wise. Plumbing systems with sold fuel heat sources would also warrant such measures.

Most quality thermostatic mixer valves feature anti-scald devices.
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cantaloup63 (30 Nov 2011)
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cantaloup63

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 11:06 pm Reply with quote

shagty wrote:
cantaloup63 wrote:
In what circumstances would a pro install a pre-mixer (anti-scald) blender?


For non-domestic plumbing applications in healthcare/childcare projects, anti-scald measures are required. For domestic projects where vulnerable people have access to the plumbing system, anti-scald measures would be wise. Plumbing systems with sold fuel heat sources would also warrant such measures.

Most quality thermostatic mixer valves feature anti-scald devices.
Do most modern (new)builds have to be part M compliant and thus these valves fitted to (or specified) mixer taps as standard? Indeed, in an example of either a bidet or WC doucher shower would it be necessary?
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shagty

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 9:36 pm Reply with quote

cantaloup63 wrote:
shagty wrote:
cantaloup63 wrote:
In what circumstances would a pro install a pre-mixer (anti-scald) blender?


For non-domestic plumbing applications in healthcare/childcare projects, anti-scald measures are required. For domestic projects where vulnerable people have access to the plumbing system, anti-scald measures would be wise. Plumbing systems with sold fuel heat sources would also warrant such measures.

Most quality thermostatic mixer valves feature anti-scald devices.
Do most modern (new)builds have to be part M compliant and thus these valves fitted to (or specified) mixer taps as standard? Indeed, in an example of either a bidet or WC doucher shower would it be necessary?



I think construction standards associated with plumbing are confined to part G of the regs.

The regulations for England, Wales and Scotland include the requirement that baths are fitted with anti-scald devices, whereas all other fittings appear to be excluded. Scalding risks are higher with baths when compared to basins or sinks for example.

This is somewhat analogous to breaker disconnection times for fixed and hand held electrical appliances.
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shagty

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 9:51 pm Reply with quote

The following links take you to part G of the regs, the code of practice for safe working temperatures, and a random installation guide for TMV's.

Regs:
http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/buildingregulations/approveddocuments/partg/approved

Code of practice:
www.beama.org.uk/.../84B7267F-2635-410A-8AFBF3D46F889E5C

Installation guide:
http:/ /www.relianceworldwide.com/site/pdf/aus/hermomixIS59_install_instruct.pdf

hope you find this helpful icon_surprised.gif
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