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Drill into concrete without SDS?

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Stivino

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:01 am Reply with quote

Monkeh wrote:
When will people grasp that masonry bits are not sharp?


In that case I must have been wasting my money when I used to put my larger bits into a local machine shop to have them sharpened.
http://diydata.com/tool/drillbits/drillbits.php
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ceecjc1

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:03 am Reply with quote

Stivino wrote:
Monkeh wrote:
When will people grasp that masonry bits are not sharp?


In that case I must have been wasting my money when I used to put my larger bits into a local machine shop to have them sharpened.
http://diydata.com/tool/drillbits/drillbits.php


Aw man I dunno, I come on this forum to get advice on stuff like this icon_smile.gif
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Monkeh

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:27 am Reply with quote

Stivino wrote:
Monkeh wrote:
When will people grasp that masonry bits are not sharp?


In that case I must have been wasting my money when I used to put my larger bits into a local machine shop to have them sharpened.
http://diydata.com/tool/drillbits/drillbits.php


There's a difference between restoring the proper shape (which is NOT a cutting edge and as such is NOT sharp!) and sharpening a tool.

I have to admit for larger sizes (>16mm) it makes sense to get the tip cleaned up from time to time, other sizes are disposable (and often lose the tip entirely or snap long before it can wear down).
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Stivino

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 11:32 am Reply with quote

http://diydata.com/tool/drillbits/drillbits.php

"As the name suggests, these are designed for drilling into brick, block, stone, quarry tiles or concrete. The cutting tip is often made from tungsten carbide bonded to a spiralled steel shaft. Some masonry drills are described as 'durium tipped', this term refers to a highly durable silicon bronze alloy used instead of tungsten as the cutting point."
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Monkeh

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 11:34 am Reply with quote

Stivino wrote:
http://diydata.com/tool/drillbits/drillbits.php

"As the name suggests, these are designed for drilling into brick, block, stone, quarry tiles or concrete. The cutting tip is often made from tungsten carbide bonded to a spiralled steel shaft. Some masonry drills are described as 'durium tipped', this term refers to a highly durable silicon bronze alloy used instead of tungsten as the cutting point."


I don't care if they call it a cutting tip, it does not cut.
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catlad

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:38 pm Reply with quote

You need to use Irwin masonry cordless bits with out the hammer action! or you will blunt them! yes blunt them.
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Homervanderjazz

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 10:25 pm Reply with quote

"You need to use Irwin masonry cordless bits with out the hammer action! or you will blunt them! yes blunt them."


what? So people should not use the hammer action when using masonary bits? I thought the hammer action was specifically designed for masonary??
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Monkeh

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 10:35 pm Reply with quote

Homervanderjazz wrote:
"You need to use Irwin masonry cordless bits with out the hammer action! or you will blunt them! yes blunt them."


what? So people should not use the hammer action when using masonary bits? I thought the hammer action was specifically designed for masonary??


He's probably talking about the all singing all dancing ones which cut wood, too. Except they don't, because use on masonry will take the cutting edges off and turn them into any ordinary masonry drill. Which is why I have appropriate drills for each task.
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catlad

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 8:22 pm Reply with quote

I was pessimistic too, and of course they dull but they will save a lot of time and your battery power untill that happens. No hammer action so less hear ache too.
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Sid71

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 9:18 pm Reply with quote

For what it's worth I've recently invested in a Li-ion Makita Combi drill http://www.combidrilldeals.co.uk/drills/makita-bhp453rftk-18v-combi-hammer-drill(cordless) and it's goes straight into concrete. Not quite as good as my Bosch Blue SDS but not bad
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JobAndKnock

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 9:53 pm Reply with quote

Sid71 wrote:
For what it's worth I've recently invested in a Li-ion Makita Combi drill http://www.combidrilldeals.co.uk/drills/makita-bhp453rftk-18v-combi-hammer-drill(cordless) and it's goes straight into concrete. Not quite as good as my Bosch Blue SDS but not bad

Forgive me for being a sceptic, but if that were the case all the time we wouldn't need SDS drills, would we? There are some grades of concrete (and for that matter bricks) which an impact won't touch. Fortunately these are rarely encountered in domestic dwellings.


Last edited by JobAndKnock on Sun Mar 25, 2012 10:42 pm, edited 1 time in total
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Monkeh

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 10:10 pm Reply with quote

Most ordinary concrete blocks and pours (for ground-level floor slabs) are relatively easily drilled with a percussion drill, for small holes. Things change quite dramatically when you get into serious grades of concrete (try drilling a lintel with that thing, see how quickly it fails to go through).
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