DIYnot
Local | Network
   DIYnot > Forums
Local | Network
DIYnot Network Local DIYnot Network Local  
  Forum IndexForum Index     RulesRules    HelpHelp     Join FREERegister Free     About CookiesCookies     SearchSearch     LoginLogin 

lock in

This topic originated from the How to page called Cylinder nightlatch
Click here to return to the page called Cylinder nightlatch.

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Windows and Doors
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
cras7033

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Oct 2007
Posts: 1
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 6:04 pm Reply with quote

Hello,
I\\\'d like to know whether there\\\'s a way to tample with a nightlatch so that once the door is slammed shut, it can no longer be opened from the inside of the house (turning the knob) but only from the outside, using the key?

Thanks in advance,

Cras
Back to top
 Alert Moderators

If you do not want to see this advert, click here to login or if you are new click here to join free.
yandownie

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Aug 2007
Posts: 97
Location: Merseyside,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 5:40 am Reply with quote

it can easily be done on any nightlatch really,only problem is that then it becomes a possable fire hazard as you shut off a means of escape,possably even breaking the law depending on the location of the door?
dare i ask the reason for this idea?
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
JohnD

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Nov 2005
Posts: 36609
Location: Hampshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1352 times

PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 9:59 am Reply with quote

If you have a door with glass panels or a handy letterbox, it is usual to fit a nightlatch that can be operated in this way, to prevent some of the easiest ways of making a forced entry. It can be operated with a key. they are sometimes called "double cylinder nightlatches" as you have a key cylinder inside and out.

It should only be deadlocked when the house is unoccupied, because of the need to escape in an emergency, as yandownie says. You can't rely on being able to find the key when the house is full of smoke.

If you want to secure it at night, a large bolt or chain is better, as you don't need a key to escape.

Since nightlatches are usually quite weak and insecure, if you are thinking of keeping burglars out, it is better to fit a deadlock as well as the nightlatch. this is much more secure, and having two locks on the door makes it more difficult to force open. Preferably fit one of the locks a third up from the bottom of the door, and one a third down from the top.

Again, you should only lock the deadlock when the house is unoccupied.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
imamartian

from United Kingdom

Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 8994
Location: Derbyshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 54 times

PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 8:19 pm Reply with quote

I have a similar requirement here, reason being is i have three small kids, and i can't be sure they would turn a key, or put a chain across when they come in, therefore anyone could gain access when they come to the door.

So for a nightlatch with a knob on the inside, and a key on the outside would be perfect, but can you do this on a uPVC door?

Thanks
(and cras7033 sorry for hi-jacking your post icon_smile.gif )
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
JohnD

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Nov 2005
Posts: 36609
Location: Hampshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1352 times

PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 8:29 pm Reply with quote

'course you can



instead of



but on wooden doors



not

Back to top
 Alert Moderators
HandyHands

from United Kingdom

Joined: 06 Dec 2005
Posts: 545
Location: Derbyshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 16 times

PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 8:34 pm Reply with quote

The above still relies upon the child turning the thumbturn to lock the door. There are models of multipoint locks that have a nightlatch function, which disables the outside handle once closed, and requires the key to open from the outside. The inside operates as normal. This would require a replacement of your mechanism, and probably the frame strikes - not a cheap option.

Example: http://www.buyourlocks.com/product_details.php?pid=1089


Last edited by HandyHands on Tue Oct 16, 2007 8:59 pm, edited 1 time in total
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
imamartian

from United Kingdom

Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 8994
Location: Derbyshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 54 times

PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 8:34 pm Reply with quote

That looks great, but is it a nightlatch - am i understanding this correctly? i want it to be locked when it's pushed to... and with no turning of knobs or keys icon_rolleyes.gif

thanks
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Windows and Doors All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Similar Topics   Replies   Views   Posted 
door won`t always lock on conservatory 4 60 Tue Sep 06, 2011 6:50 am
Fitting a latch lock & escutcheon to a Fire Door? 4 40 Mon Aug 29, 2011 4:22 pm
Changing a door lock/composite type door. 4 40 Mon Aug 29, 2011 8:01 pm
Any lock experts? Key sticking in lock 5 160 Thu Aug 25, 2011 2:17 pm
Replacing lock for a slam-lock gate 2 40 Sun Sep 18, 2011 12:44 pm


 
DIYnot
Find an Expert | Find a Supplier | Search DIYnot.com
Network | Advertising | Newsletter
DIY | DIY How To | @home | DIY Wiki | DIY Forum
By using this site you agree to our Terms of Service / Disclaimer.
Please read our Privacy Policy. Copyright © 2000-2014 DIYnot Limited.