DIYnot
Local | Network
   DIYnot > Forums
Local | Network
DIYnot Network Local DIYnot Network Local  
  Forum IndexForum Index     RulesRules    HelpHelp     Join FREERegister Free     About CookiesCookies     SearchSearch     LoginLogin 

Space to fit a new gas cooker!


 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Appliances
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
giveusaclue

from United Kingdom

Joined: 18 Nov 2008
Posts: 14
Location: Yorkshire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 12:54 pm Reply with quote

Hi all,

I'm just in the process of buying new appliances for my kitchen and have a question that needs answering before I can choose my new cooker icon_rolleyes.gif

I already have a gas cooker which has been installed for years (by a qualified gas fitter at the time)

While looking into buying my new cooker, I've found on some websites that it states 'minimum distance required to fit gas cooker is 750mm'
I'm guessing that this means the distance between the top of the cooker and whatever is above it. icon_question.gif

The problem is, I only have about 610mm! Above my cooker are just some wall units and they don't overhang the cooker completely. (they are about 300mm deep and the cooker is 600mm deep). Both the old cooker and the one I want to get have a glass lid and there is no problem currently with lifting it and I haven't had a problem with steam up to now. I know an extractor fan would be best but unfortunately I can't afford to change this at the mo plus I need the cupboard space!

Basically, do you think (or know icon_biggrin.gif ) if a corgi registered gas fitter would fit a gas cooker with a glass lid into the space that I have?

Thanks Guys! icon_smile.gif
Back to top
 Alert Moderators

If you do not want to see this advert, click here to login or if you are new click here to join free.
foxhole

from United Kingdom

Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 7652
Location: Kent,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 784 times

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 1:48 pm Reply with quote

If it's a bayonet fitting then quite easy to change yourself.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
giveusaclue

from United Kingdom

Joined: 18 Nov 2008
Posts: 14
Location: Yorkshire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 3:02 pm Reply with quote

It is a bayonet fitting but I thought it wasn't good practice to fit things like this yourself?

I'd rather be safe than sorry especially as I rent a room out in my house so all the appliances are shared!

I know people who aren't corgi that would fit it for me but I don't know what or how much they know about things like this! Its one thing putting me at risk but..... icon_eek.gif
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
giveusaclue

from United Kingdom

Joined: 18 Nov 2008
Posts: 14
Location: Yorkshire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 10:24 pm Reply with quote

Just to let people know.

I found out that minimum distance from the top of a gas cooker to whatever is above it is:

750mm for an extractor fan

or

600mm for wall units

This means I can have a new gas cooker fitted by a corgi registered fitter. He does advise that the cupboard goes and and extractor is fitted but its not a legal requirement so i can wait till I can afford! Good news all round! icon_razz.gif

ciao
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
kirkgas

from United Kingdom

Joined: 26 Dec 2007
Posts: 4828
Location: Lanarkshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 455 times

PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 11:43 pm Reply with quote

i'm not sure your last post with dimensions is correct, in the absense of specific instructions the default sizes are used, the way i have always read them was 760mm height from the hob is required to combustible surface, if you are fitting an extractor you need to check the MI for that as well, if cooker and extractor MI's are different you MUST use the higher dimenson.
if the wall units adjacent to the hob/cooker are at least 460mm above the worktop they can be in line with the edges of the hob/cooker, if lower than 460mm there needs to be at least 50mm gap between the edge of the unit and the vertical line of the hob/cooker
PS if you live in a multi occupancy dwelling, your new cooker MUST gave FSD (Flame Supervision Device) fitted to all burners
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
doyle

from United Kingdom

Joined: 02 Nov 2006
Posts: 698
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 2 times

PostPosted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 12:07 pm Reply with quote

dude......................... no way

having done acs gas course, if a gas engineer came to your house after t was installed and their was anysign what so ever that heat is affecting anything within the 750mm clearance he will cut your gas of as ID ...IMMEDIATLY DANGEROUS.

dont matter whether its got a glass lid that only shuts the gas off if you accidently leave gas on when lowerin the lid, it doesnt stop the heat fo cooking rising and damaging anything that is above it, what the clearance is .is to say anything in that radious could combust..........bye bye house insurance claim they dont cover diy neglegence.

the isntallation engineer that fits it will abide to MI manufactorers instructions where possible as he is responsible for it.

however...........

if you fit it and somert happens its your fault tuff luck on the insurance and good luck with the manslaughter charges( worst case scenario) but when you next gt a gas man in it is not current standards (ncs)dependign on number of ncs there are ....2 maximum.

so by not adhering to the clearance you have halved the available ncs before mandatory capping off the gas meter/repair by corgi registered gas man.same if theri is any sign of damage to anything within that radius of MI's 750mm caused by heat sources.

another scenario is ok youve fitted the cooker its nto to current standards and the gas shut valve operated by the fails due to grease build up then that is your two ncs's spent up after that it become automatically classed as immediatly dangerous even if the item within the 750mm clearnace show no sign of combustions.

once its been classed as id, the faults need immediate rectifications your gas will not be reinstated until it is.

your choice what you do fit yourself or call someone in or even relocate teh interfering object.

remember though the ncs only build up with defects or faults nothing else wrong then it remains as ncs which im sure you aint over concerned with.adcise would be if theri is any sign that the new cooker intallation is casuing heat damage to what ever is within that 750 feild then rectify it.
slightest sign of heat damage even in the slightest to what ever is bove it then its immediatly dangerous and then needs immediate repairs
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
giveusaclue

from United Kingdom

Joined: 18 Nov 2008
Posts: 14
Location: Yorkshire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 12:33 pm Reply with quote

Ok,

Call me dim but now I'm even more confused than ever! icon_confused.gif I no nothing about gas, fitting or otherwise. But, I do know it is dangerous if not done right!

Think what I'm going to have to do is get a corgi registered gas plumber round to look at my specific situation and see what he say's!

If gas is a no go then.....

Does anyone know if there are the same rules and regulations for electric freestanding cookers?

I know they would need wiring up by a professional but that wouldn't be much of a problem!!! icon_biggrin.gif

Nowt's ever easy is it!
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
doyle

from United Kingdom

Joined: 02 Nov 2006
Posts: 698
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 2 times

PostPosted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 7:56 pm Reply with quote

mucker its about safety heat sources can cause fire

ok lets go back to instructions

restrictions may be to either side of the cooker and directly above, if cupbaord is present it may catch fire...so when a gas man enters the house and see's any heat damage to it then hes going to say oi this is dangerous and needs immediate rectification..........however if there is no sign of heat damage then he will simply advise to make alterations saying it does not meet current standards ie what it says in the manufactorers intructions.

if a corgi man does teh job then he does it to rule, if you do it and later a corgi man enters it does not mean oi get that cooker off it simply means its not fitted to current regulations or standards.

the reason why it is said in instructions is that heat rises directly above the cooker anything combustable will inevitably be able to catch fire and so on and if people are hurt then things gt investigated adn people gt charged in worst case scenarios.

your best bet is posting your question in the plumbing section that is where all the gas men are.

as a past comment made by anotehr person if its bayonet then you can do yourself............i recon if you then get charing of any kind then the cooker is causin a poblem and then rectify teh problemas it is tehn deemed to be immediatly dangerous.

extractor shouldnt be a real issues depending whether youve got exposed cables leading to it in that radius i taek it, it is metal canopy styled extractor that isnt likely to burst into flames.

what clearance do you have by the way and what cooker are you thinking about fittting so i can look at installation guide n comparison to what you have
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
kirkgas

from United Kingdom

Joined: 26 Dec 2007
Posts: 4828
Location: Lanarkshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 455 times

PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:36 am Reply with quote

if you can't get correct clearances to combustible surface (ie base of wall unit) you can cover the base of the unit with something like supalux which is hear resistent, remember the regs are minimum clearances to combustible surfaces, no mention of distance to non combustible, other than minimal clearances for air flow etc, it always gives you another option
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
doyle

from United Kingdom

Joined: 02 Nov 2006
Posts: 698
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 2 times

PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 12:09 pm Reply with quote

there you go, combustable materials.......still helps if you let us know what clearances you have got to the kitchen wall hung cupboards
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Appliances All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Similar Topics   Replies   Views   Posted 
built in cooker/ fitted cooker into freestanding space 2 60 Wed Dec 14, 2011 7:47 pm
Space around a fridge freezer 2 60 Mon Apr 15, 2013 11:42 am
Space either side of Range? 3 1040 Wed Jan 24, 2007 6:06 pm
Tall oven housing - space at the sides 3 120 Tue Jul 12, 2011 2:34 pm
moving an oven... what do i put in the space?? 3 80 Wed Jan 11, 2012 5:59 pm


 
DIYnot
Find an Expert | Find a Supplier | Search DIYnot.com
Network | Advertising | Newsletter
DIY | DIY How To | @home | DIY Wiki | DIY Forum
By using this site you agree to our Terms of Service / Disclaimer.
Please read our Privacy Policy. Copyright © 2000-2014 DIYnot Limited.