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What Gas certificates do I need when I sell my house?

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spils

from United Kingdom

Joined: 04 Sep 2009
Posts: 9
Location: Lancashire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 1:46 pm Reply with quote

About a year ago I had a flueless gas fire installed in the living room and a new gas hob installed in the kitchen. It was all done properly by a corgi registered fitter and he provided the appropriate paperwork having completed both jobs.

I put the paperwork somewhere safe, so safe that i can't find it and have just put my house on the market.

When I find a buyer and the solicitors get involved, will they want to see paperwork for gas safety and am I better getting it sorted now?

I can get the fitter back around for a gas safety check or whatevers needed no worries, I just want to be armed with the right information before I contact him.

Thanks in advance, Spils.
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n1qbal

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Joined: 10 Sep 2009
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Location: Birmingham,
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 1:50 pm Reply with quote

I think you talking about the Landlord certificate im not too sure you need them when selling your home but would be a plus for the potential buyer
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doitall

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 3:29 pm Reply with quote

Why would he want a Landlords cert.

I should think he means GWN, and yes it would be better if you can find it.
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spils

from United Kingdom

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Location: Lancashire,
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 3:35 pm Reply with quote

doitall wrote:
I should think he means GWN, and yes it would be better if you can find it.


What is a GWN?

Assuming this has been forever lost, can I get copies from the installer or will he have to do something else?
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doitall

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 3:45 pm Reply with quote

Gas Works Notification.

Corgi or your planning dept may have a copy assuming Corgi sent it to them.
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mickyg

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 6:45 pm Reply with quote

Seeing as it was a year ago, your gas appliances are due a service anyway, especially the flueless fire.
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bengasman

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 7:05 pm Reply with quote

To keep things in perspective:
You don't NEED anything to do with the gas to sell your house, nor for electricity, the general plumbing, the water, or the waste.
Some lawyers insist that you come up with all sorts of paperwork for 3 reasons.
Every letter they send, they can charge.
It makes them look thorough and important.
Passing the buck.
When you put your house on the market, it will save you a lot of money to ask the lawyer what kind of paperwork they want with respect to the state of the house. A "gas certificate" and "electric certificate" have absolutely no value for you, but can easily cost you several hundred pounds.

Servicing the fire when it is a year old, is a good idea. Turning it off, and never using it again, would be a great idea. The resident RGI's on the forum disagree on an enormous amount of subjects, and only 2 subjects have pretty much unanimous agreement. Flueless fires being an accident waiting to happen is one of them.
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Boilerman2

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 7:06 pm Reply with quote

Cooker shouldn't be a problem ,because they no longer have to be notified under GWR, and as they are not a heating appliance, don't need to be notified to LABC under Part L1 Blg regs, But the Gas Fire is a Heating appliance, you should have reiceved a certificate from CORGI, stating that the gas fire installation had been Self Certified by the installer.

Corgi should have sent a copy to your local council LABC Dept, so a quick call to the planning records office should bear fruit. icon_wink.gif
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K2harry

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Joined: 15 Aug 2008
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Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 7:10 pm Reply with quote

Bought and sold a few houses (not recently however!). Any gas work involving a flued appliance post 2002 requires a building regs cert.

Solicitors only ever questioned central heating boiler however.

Would certainly be worth getting a gas safety certificate from a gas safe registered engineer though and this would suffice for your existing appliances.
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bengasman

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 7:38 pm Reply with quote

K2harry wrote:
Bought and sold a few houses (not recently however!). Any gas work involving a flued appliance post 2002 requires a building regs cert.


Please be so kind to tell us (me) where you get this information from? RGI's can selfcertify there work, and don't need to have anything to do with the council/building control. The owner of the house is entitled to this document, but has no obligation whatsoever to present this to a buyer or the lawyers representing him.

K2harry wrote:
Solicitors only ever questioned central heating boiler however.


They can question all they want, but legally speaking from the point of selling the house, it is none of their business.

K2harry wrote:
Would certainly be worth getting a gas safety certificate from a gas safe registered engineer


Worth what? Completely pointless to get this certificate, apart from filling my pockets.

..
K2harry wrote:
this would suffice for your existing appliances.


Suffice to do what? It proves nothing, apart from being within legal limits at the time of testing. Doesn't mean it is good, reliable, or even that it is safe today.


Last edited by bengasman on Thu Sep 10, 2009 7:45 pm, edited 3 times in total
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namsag

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 7:43 pm Reply with quote

By the way its post april 2005 it had to be registered not 2002
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K2harry

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 8:05 pm Reply with quote

sorry didn't mean to touch a nerve just relating to my own experiences

1. Yes I know gas engineers self certify there work but when an appliance is registered by the engineer the certificate sent to the homeowner once it has been registered etc etc

I have found that buying and selling can and is a pain in the backside so if you can be pre armed then all the better. A buyers solicitor can seriously encourage the buyer to hold back until certain assurances like certificates are given regardless of the entitlement or legalities. What I suggested would save a lot of time and aggrevation. In order to get a quicker sell I even had to go down the route of taking out an indemnity policy because I stated the boiler was fitted after 2005 (sorry not 2002) but had no certificate (not a gas safety certificate but the post registration one from the then CORGI)

I know a gas safe certificate is only valid at the time it is issued but surely better to have one to state an appliance has been checked recently rather than not at all - if for no other reason than for a possibly easier transition to selling and buying.
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bengasman

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 8:34 pm Reply with quote

It may be quicker and easier to spend hundreds of pounds to give the difficult lawyer anything and everything he asks for.
That doesn't alter the fact that you don't need any of those documents to sell your house.
Which is what the OP asked.
Hence my advice stating as much, and recommending to find a lawyer that actually knows what is important, and what is irrelevant.
Like there are lots of RGI's that just change parts on a defective boiler until it starts working again and charge loads of money for it, there are lots of clueless lawyers that write loads of pointless letters and charge lots of money for it.
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K2harry

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Joined: 15 Aug 2008
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Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 8:43 pm Reply with quote

Loads of conveyancers now just charge a one off fee regardless of the amount of letters they write or phone calls they make.

But Ok you're right the OP did ask what was needed and not what could make his experience go more smoothly. Apologies
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K2harry

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Aug 2008
Posts: 33
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 9:02 pm Reply with quote

Loads of conveyancers now just charge a one off fee regardless of the amount of letters they write or phone calls they make.

But Ok you're right the OP did ask what was needed and not what could make his experience go more smoothly. Apologies
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