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Are back to wall toilets hard to install?


 
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aa44

from United Kingdom

Joined: 28 Oct 2008
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Location: Shetland,
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 5:37 pm Reply with quote

I am currently specifying a new house (for me). I was wandering round a bathroom store the other day and noticed some back to wall close coupled toilets that looked really smart as all the pipework was completely hidden. Are these things a nightmare to fit?

Thanks
AA
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Burnerman

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 5:44 pm Reply with quote

The loo and the flush cistern are hung on a steel frame that gets covered by panelling of some description, and they do work very well. You have to allow access for maintenance though which may give you more panel joints than you'd like. Often the flush is an air operated push button which gives trouble from time to time.
John icon_smile.gif
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aa44

from United Kingdom

Joined: 28 Oct 2008
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Location: Shetland,
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 5:58 pm Reply with quote

Thanks John. We used to have a concealed cistern with an air operated flush and it was a nightmare! I was forever having to take the front panel off. For that reason, I'm looking at a close coupled back to wall model rather than a concealed cistern, something like

http://www.ideal-standard.co.uk/imagine/standard-toilet-(close-coupled)-wc-t312501.aspx

I'm just wondering how you actually attach the soil pipe for something like this when you can't see the connections. Is it accessible from above before you fit the cistern?
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Steady

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:04 pm Reply with quote

That's not a back to the wall toilet-it's just a close-coupled one.
Welcome to the modern world of concealed pipework that every bathroom seemingly must have.
In short,you will have to improvise -there are flexis and the like which will make life easier but I still wouldn't want one in my house. If the pan connector has a small leak you aren't going to know for a while.
At the end of the day designers don't have to fit 'em. Plumbers do.
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Burnerman

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:10 pm Reply with quote

aa44 wrote:
Thanks John. We used to have a concealed cistern with an air operated flush and it was a nightmare! I was forever having to take the front panel off. For that reason, I'm looking at a close coupled back to wall model rather than a concealed cistern, something like

http://www.ideal-standard.co.uk/imagine/standard-toilet-(close-coupled)-wc-t312501.aspx

I'm just wondering how you actually attach the soil pipe for something like this when you can't see the connections. Is it accessible from above before you fit the cistern?


Yep thats an ordinary close coupled one, albeit a fab looker! You've hit the nail right on the head - soil pipe connections are a real issue with these, ok maybe in a new build where you can access the coupling from the ceiling below, or in a suspended timber build where you can get at it from below and to one side. If the outlet is directly through a wall behind thats ok too. Other than that they are a real nightmare should you need to take it out again!
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Norcon

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:23 pm Reply with quote

Geberit are the best IMO and you don't have to fit any access panels.
There's one compression joint though which needs pressure testing before concealment.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpR_u0MGlic

Not a lot more to it than the video above. icon_biggrin.gif



Last edited by Norcon on Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:35 pm, edited 2 times in total
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kevindgas

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:30 pm Reply with quote

fitted a couple of these beauties and found that if you use a flexible pipe for the filler and measure and measure again the soil pipe to make 100% sure it is the right length, then no problem
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dextrous

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 7:19 pm Reply with quote

Norcon, in that photo, that's one tiny little towel rad icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif

Guess they spent too much on the tiles and your fees icon_wink.gif
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Norcon

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 7:24 pm Reply with quote

Guess so.
Its in place now though. Thats an earlier image. icon_wink.gif
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aa44

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Location: Shetland,
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 8:51 pm Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies.
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