DIYnot
Local | Network
   DIYnot > Forums
Local | Network
DIYnot Network Local DIYnot Network Local  
  Forum IndexForum Index     RulesRules    HelpHelp     Join FREERegister Free     About CookiesCookies     SearchSearch     LoginLogin 

Replacing Old Non Condensing Boiler


 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Plumbing and Central Heating
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
AndyNewBuild

from United Kingdom

Joined: 27 Jul 2008
Posts: 55
Location: Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 11:59 am Reply with quote

Hi All,

I have a small rental flat which has a 10 year old non condensing boiler which needs replacing. The boiler is for a small two bedroom flat and is a combi boiler which is what the replacement will be. I'm looking at several options but would appreciate some advice on a few issues which have come up.

The current boiler is in a cupboard located against a party wall with no easy access to outside from the cupboard. The vertical flue rises about 3 to 4m from the boiler to the pitched roof terminal. Obviously this will need replaced with a flue suitable for condensing boilers. However I've been told the length may cause problems. Also there is an issue with getting the condensate away as there is no nearby outside wall.

One option to solve the above problems is moving the boiler into the loft directly above it's current location. This would reduce the flue length substantially but also allow the condensate an exit via the eaves or similar.

I assume the condensate would have to be taken back down to ground level via pipework? Are there any issues with having a combi boiler located in the loft?

Has anyone any other suggestions as moving the boiler to an outside wall would be very tricky and expensive.

Your advice is appreciated.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators

If you do not want to see this advert, click here to login or if you are new click here to join free.
D_Hailsham

from United Kingdom

Joined: 18 Oct 2007
Posts: 8556
Location: Sussex,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 984 times

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:34 pm Reply with quote

When you say you have a "rental flat", I assume you are talking as the landlord. If you are the tenant, it's the landlords responsibility to deal with boiler changes.

I assume the flat is immediately below the loft space. If so, you should have no problem with the flue. The boiler manufacturers will specify a maximum flue length in their literature.

You can't just use any flue which is "suitable for condensing boilers; you have to use the boiler manufacturers own flue. If you don't, it will invalidate any warranty.

One solution to getting rid of the condensate is run the pipe through the loft to the stack pipe for the toilet etc. You would have to fit a condensate pump to lift the condensate a metre or so into the loft.

My son had a similar problem when his boiler was replaced before Christmas and this was the solution used. The boiler is in the airing cupboard in the bedroom. The boiler is inaudible and the pump only runs every 15 minutes or so for a few seconds.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
AndyNewBuild

from United Kingdom

Joined: 27 Jul 2008
Posts: 55
Location: Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:53 pm Reply with quote

Thanks for the reply,

Yes I'm the landlord! I also know the flue needs to be from the boiler manufacturer, I was just emphasising that the current flue could not be used as the current boiler is non condensing.

The flat is directly below the loft space which is self contained for the flat and not accessible by any of the other flats.

Unfortunately there is no stack pipe in the loft from the toilet. I think there is one main stack pipe for all the flats and is centrally located but there isn't one in the loft of the flat.

If I moved the boiler to the loft, which is fully boarded and lighted, can the condensate not discharge from a pipe through the eaves?

Thanks again for the replies.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
D_Hailsham

from United Kingdom

Joined: 18 Oct 2007
Posts: 8556
Location: Sussex,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 984 times

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 1:13 pm Reply with quote

AndyNewBuild wrote:
Unfortunately there is no stack pipe in the loft from the toilet. I think there is one main stack pipe for all the flats and is centrally located but there isn't one in the loft of the flat.

If I moved the boiler to the loft, which is fully boarded and lighted, can the condensate not discharge from a pipe through the eaves?

As the loft is already boarded and lighted there is no reason why you should not put the boiler there. Presumably you have a proper loft ladder and not just a pair of steps and haul yourself up! The condensate pipe could exit the eaves and go down the outside and discharge into a drain. There could however be problem with the pipe freezing up. If you cannot pick up the stack pipe, you can always come back down into the bathroom and connect into the bath or basin waste pipe.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
AndyNewBuild

from United Kingdom

Joined: 27 Jul 2008
Posts: 55
Location: Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 1:29 pm Reply with quote

Yes there is a properly fitted loft ladder. I would probably need to put a rail round the hatch though for safety but this wouldn't be a problem.

Hadn't thought about the freezing problem, thanks for that. I could come down into the bathroom waste but hiding the pipe would be a problem although all the internal walls are studwork. However the bathroom is at the opposite end of the loft so getting the required fall may be tricky. The kitchen is a little closer but again hiding the discharge pipe would be difficult. The other option would be to discharge into the top of a drain pipe - is this acceptable though? Would reduce the run which is outside and hence reduce the freezing problem.

Thanks again.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
slapper

from United Kingdom

Joined: 20 Jan 2008
Posts: 1330
Location: Lincolnshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 248 times

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 2:19 pm Reply with quote

As long as it discharges into a foul drain,no probs. Bear in mind the winter we have just had with alot of condensate pipes freezing up,if it can be run inside then all the better,if outside step the diameter of the pipe up to 32mm minimum,and lag with a good waterproof insulate.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
fullyuntrainedplumber

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Jan 2010
Posts: 57
Location: Lancashire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 4:06 pm Reply with quote

My condensate pipe froze up last weekend (42mm dia) I insulated it and it froze again thus boiler would not operate.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
linkyplumb

from United Kingdom

Joined: 08 Sep 2008
Posts: 1325
Location: Hampshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 161 times

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 6:33 pm Reply with quote

fullyuntrainedplumber wrote:
My condensate pipe froze up last weekend (42mm dia) I insulated it and it froze again thus boiler would not operate.


What kind of fall has the pipe got on it?
Graham
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Axel

from United Kingdom

Joined: 21 Sep 2008
Posts: 936
Location: London,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 78 times

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 7:32 pm Reply with quote

If your tenant is either on benefits or even just claiming child tax credits, you can get Warmfront to pay the costs to replace boiler, although many are not impressed with the contractors that are appointed
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
fullyuntrainedplumber

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Jan 2010
Posts: 57
Location: Lancashire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 7:56 pm Reply with quote

Pipe has about 5ft drop, then thru 90 degrees horizontal to grid.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
AndyNewBuild

from United Kingdom

Joined: 27 Jul 2008
Posts: 55
Location: Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 2:24 pm Reply with quote

Yes she is on benefits so will check out the Warmfront scheme. I thought this would only apply if she owned the property, not just rented it.

Thanks for the information.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Axel

from United Kingdom

Joined: 21 Sep 2008
Posts: 936
Location: London,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 78 times

PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 5:06 pm Reply with quote

No, it also applies if tenant is elegible. They might say they won't fit a new boilunless the old one is knackered, but that's not hard to arrange!

It takes them a few months to respond.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Plumbing and Central Heating All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Similar Topics   Replies   Views   Posted 
Replacing oil boiler for condensing oil boiler?? 12 1340 Fri Dec 21, 2007 10:36 pm
replacing an IDEAL ICOS condensing gas boiler? 2 560 Thu Oct 16, 2008 11:07 am
Replacing Rayburn with Condensing boiler problem 4 80 Sat Dec 15, 2012 5:44 pm
Replacing back boiler for condensing boiler 17 5340 Thu Mar 01, 2007 10:34 am
Replacing expansion vessel on condensing boiler 15 1120 Fri May 08, 2009 11:38 am


 
DIYnot
Find an Expert | Find a Supplier | Search DIYnot.com
Network | Advertising | Newsletter
DIY | DIY How To | @home | DIY Wiki | DIY Forum
By using this site you agree to our Terms of Service / Disclaimer.
Please read our Privacy Policy. Copyright © 2000-2014 DIYnot Limited.