DIYnot
Local | Network
   DIYnot > Forums
Local | Network
DIYnot Network Local DIYnot Network Local  
  Forum IndexForum Index     RulesRules    HelpHelp     Join FREERegister Free     About CookiesCookies     SearchSearch     LoginLogin 

when and where to apply stabilizer?


 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Decorating and Painting
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
donmaico

from United Kingdom

Joined: 11 Nov 2008
Posts: 141
Location: Sussex,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1 time

PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 2010 6:44 pm Reply with quote

I prepared a south facing wall with a view to applying stabiliser and 3 coats of exterior quality paint as advised by a builder.I then went down to Brewers to buy some told the retailer what i wanted it for and he gtursn round and strongly advises not to put stabilizer on bare brickwork as it will all come off in 6 months time together with whatever paint I apply over it.He said it was the most common mistake made. e suggested applying exterior primer on the bare areas and stabiliser on the rest.
Thing its a previously painted surface but about 30-40 % of its is now either bare brick or partially bare brick .Anwyay i emailed Sandtex and they sent me an adobe reader and i read this:

"New surfaces All surfaces must be sound, suitably dry and free from anything that will interfere with the
adhesion of the materials to be applied. Surfaces with suction (porous surfaces) should be
treated with an application of Sandtex Trade Water Borne Stabilising Solution.
Undecorated surfaces
All surfaces must be sound, suitably dry and free from anything that will interfere with the
adhesion of the materials to be applied."

this suggests to me that it is ok to apply stabiliser to bare bricks

So who is right? I have already painted some primer on some of the bare areas .Should I continue and then apply sabiliser over the whole lot? thanks
Back to top
 Alert Moderators

If you do not want to see this advert, click here to login or if you are new click here to join free.
johnheritage

from United Kingdom

Joined: 22 Apr 2009
Posts: 106
Location: Cheshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 11 times

PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2010 7:33 am Reply with quote

I'm not an expert on stabilizers, but I think Sandtex may be using the word to mean their primers.

Stabilizer as it's sold from painting places is usually used on surfaces where they continually have a layer of dust on them, that the will allow the paint to fall back off. The stabilizer binds the dust to the surface and lets the paint stick.

I'd go with a primer designed to go straight on bare brick and forget the cans labeled as stabilizers. I've used exterior masonry paint on new rendering and not had any problems and I've watched guys painting entire houses not using cans of stabilizers, producing a very nice result that lasts.

I go on about them so much someone will soon assume I'm working for them, but I'm not. Toolstation.com carries exterior primer and overcoat in big, cheap, effective tins. Order over 10's worth and it'll be delivered the next morning for free.
Back to top
The following user says thank you to johnheritage for this useful post:
donmaico (22 Oct 2010)
 Alert Moderators
donmaico

from United Kingdom

Joined: 11 Nov 2008
Posts: 141
Location: Sussex,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1 time

PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2010 7:47 am Reply with quote

johnheritage wrote:
I'm not an expert on stabilizers, but I think Sandtex may be using the word to mean their primers.

Stabilizer as it's sold from painting places is usually used on surfaces where they continually have a layer of dust on them, that the will allow the paint to fall back off. The stabilizer binds the dust to the surface and lets the paint stick.

I'd go with a primer designed to go straight on bare brick and forget the cans labeled as stabilizers. I've used exterior masonry paint on new rendering and not had any problems and I've watched guys painting entire houses not using cans of stabilizers, producing a very nice result that lasts.

I go on about them so much someone will soon assume I'm working for them, but I'm not. Toolstation.com carries exterior primer and overcoat in big, cheap, effective tins. Order over 10's worth and it'll be delivered the next morning for free.


maybe its more for rendered areas which have become dusty.I cant say the bricks here are although some of the pointing is getting a bit so
.in fact I had to have some replaced it was so bad.
What alarmed me was the rertailer telling me the whole lot would fall off if used stabiliser on bare bricks,Anyway i'll stick with primer for now and then go over the whole lot with 3 topcoats
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
johnheritage

from United Kingdom

Joined: 22 Apr 2009
Posts: 106
Location: Cheshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 11 times

PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:37 am Reply with quote

In terms of dusty, it's easy to confuse the word.

The kind of dust they mean is like a chalk board, where you can wipe your hand over it and it'll be covered. Then it'll reappear again over time.

For a guy in a shop to be trying to NOT sell you something, he is probably trying to help based on experience. And a rare thing.

For brickwork and mortar, the dustyness isn't so bad, that's more like bits of grit and the paint will bind over that. It's when the ENTIRE surface is constantly covered in fine, reappearing dust that you've got problems; there's nothing solid for ANY of the paint to stick to.

Artists have the same problem with things they draw or make with graphite pencils, carbon sticks, chalks and so on. The stuff will smear and it will gradually come away. So they can buy fixing agent to spray over it. It's like a transparent, low gloss lacquer / varnish / glue basically, that sticks all the trillions of tiny bits of dust in place.

If you use a primer and follow the precise directions, and it fails, you can always ask for a refund. Take an up close photo of the brickwork prior to putting it on as evidence of the surface it's gone onto.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
donmaico

from United Kingdom

Joined: 11 Nov 2008
Posts: 141
Location: Sussex,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1 time

PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2010 2:58 pm Reply with quote

johnheritage wrote:
In terms of dusty, it's easy to confuse the word.

The kind of dust they mean is like a chalk board, where you can wipe your hand over it and it'll be covered. Then it'll reappear again over time.

For a guy in a shop to be trying to NOT sell you something, he is probably trying to help based on experience. And a rare thing.

For brickwork and mortar, the dustyness isn't so bad, that's more like bits of grit and the paint will bind over that. It's when the ENTIRE surface is constantly covered in fine, reappearing dust that you've got problems; there's nothing solid for ANY of the paint to stick to.

Artists have the same problem with things they draw or make with graphite pencils, carbon sticks, chalks and so on. The stuff will smear and it will gradually come away. So they can buy fixing agent to spray over it. It's like a transparent, low gloss lacquer / varnish / glue basically, that sticks all the trillions of tiny bits of dust in place.

If you use a primer and follow the precise directions, and it fails, you can always ask for a refund. Take an up close photo of the brickwork prior to putting it on as evidence of the surface it's gone onto.


the primer I am using is oil based primer sealer made by Albany which apparently has exceptional binding qualities.Thanks any way, i will do as you suggested
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Decorating and Painting All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Similar Topics   Replies   Views   Posted 
Painted silk accidently... Can I apply matt on top of silk 19 320 Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:42 am
whats the best way to apply wax to wood? 6 100 Sun May 13, 2012 8:14 pm
how to apply size to walls. 2 80 Fri Feb 22, 2013 8:14 pm
Using a roller to apply gloss 16 380 Fri Mar 02, 2012 4:50 pm
How to remove and re-apply wood paint.... 10 220 Fri Mar 02, 2012 11:39 am


 
DIYnot
Find an Expert | Find a Supplier | Search DIYnot.com
Network | Advertising | Newsletter
DIY | DIY How To | @home | DIY Wiki | DIY Forum
By using this site you agree to our Terms of Service / Disclaimer.
Please read our Privacy Policy. Copyright © 2000-2014 DIYnot Limited.