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Rising Damp.

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Oops!

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Nov 2005
Posts: 4
Location: Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2005 4:32 pm Reply with quote

I have just purchased a property with a rising damp problem behind badly done dry lining. I intend to remove the dry lining and install a chemical dampproof, then reinstate the dry lining. Does anyone have any suggestions as to the best insulation to use. I have been recomended foil backed plasterboard with kingspan behind it. icon_question.gif
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breezer

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2005 4:58 pm Reply with quote

Make a search for rising damp, also for chemical damp proof BEFORE you do anything else
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oilman

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2005 7:54 pm Reply with quote

Then fix the real problem. Much damage or pointless work can be done with these un-needed injected DPCs.
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The Baker

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2005 11:58 pm Reply with quote

Hello opps,
If any of your mates have ammo reloading scales, or if your wifes scales read to 100th of a gram, you could reasonably establish if you have excessive moisture in the wall of your building.
Take a small piece of the wall, say an oxo size piece of brick,
Weigh it, thats the wet weight.
Put the sample piece in a low oven over night. To make good use of the oven get your misses to do some merengues at the same time.
Next day once the brick sample has cooled off weigh it, thats the dry weight.
Taking the dry weight as 100%,
if the wet weight is not more than 4 or 5% heavier, i wouldnt think it would be dampness, be it rising or penertrating.
It could be condensation.
Enjoy your merengues.
The Baker
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Oops!

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Nov 2005
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Location: Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2005 1:03 pm Reply with quote

Thanks for the advice, definitely has rising damp but render is a crap job on the outside to so this is the first job before messing around with DPC etc. unfortunately some internal walls are also showing damp signs. Any ideas of how much a chemical DPC would cost? Any wisdom on electronic DPC? All walls are two skin stone with rubble infill, around 18" thick.

Anyone used any of the Safeguard products, particularly Dryzone Dampproof Cream icon_question.gif
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masona

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2005 1:47 pm Reply with quote

Oops! wrote:
Any ideas of how much a chemical DPC would cost?

Forget it as it's unworkable.

Rising damp is normally broken dpc and about a 1 metre in height.

I have heard about Dryzone Damp-proofing Cream but can't say, I do believe the only way so far is to renew the dpc BUT only if the dpc is broken which is very rare these days.
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Softus

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2005 3:26 pm Reply with quote

Oops! wrote:
Thanks for the advice, definitely has rising damp but render is a rubbish job on the outside to so this is the first job before messing around with DPC etc. unfortunately some internal walls are also showing damp signs. Any ideas of how much a chemical DPC would cost?

Have a good read of these two topics before you commit to spending any money....
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Oops!

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Nov 2005
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Location: Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2005 5:08 pm Reply with quote

Cheers Softus, helpful topics and opinions, my wall has no DPC to fail. What order would you repair the following, Foffits rotten, slightly leaky roof, external concrete render blown in large patches, crap dry lining internally with evidence of damp in corners icon_question.gif icon_question.gif
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The Baker

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2005 5:56 pm Reply with quote

Once you have eliminated any sources of penertrating mouisture then injection mortar has been known to be succesful in solid walls like those you describe.
Regarding your other question, you could just start at the top and work your way down.
But are you absolutly sure the moisture is rising?
The Baker.
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chappers

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2005 6:07 pm Reply with quote

I would have my doubts about the effectiveness of achemical DPC and particularly in the case of a rubble filled stone wall.Electronic gizzmos do work but you need to be absolutely sure you have rising damp, as has been said its far rarer then most people think. Try getting your crappy render and drylining of and seeing if it starts to dry out.
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Tom.

from United Kingdom

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Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2005 11:29 pm Reply with quote

I wouldn't be surprised if the render is the source of the problem. Remove that and I bet most of the damp would disappear.
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Oops!

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Nov 2005
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Location: Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 8:49 pm Reply with quote

Roof then render it is then. Will wall dry out with the render removed, and also if I put on new render and it is rising damp will this then blow the new render icon_question.gif
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Softus

from United Kingdom

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 10:32 pm Reply with quote

Remove the render and the dry lining - when you've solved the damp problem the wall will dry out, but if you're plastering inside then leave it for six weeks.

When you re-render be sure not to bridge the DPC.

Don't inject - if you want to throw your money away then give it to me.
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joe-90

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 11:38 pm Reply with quote

Would someone please tell the Royal Instute of Chartered Surveyors that rising damp doesn't exist? They seem to think it does. I wonder why they think that?




joe
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empip

from United States Minor Outlying Islands

Joined: 24 Sep 2005
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2005 1:54 pm Reply with quote

Have a search centered around Venice for rising damp ... possibly the experts. http://pubs.acs.org/cen/coverstory/7835/7835sci1.html

Also.
http://www.phys.tue.nl/nfcmr/cmrmain.html
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