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burner in cooker


 
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BR

from Ireland

Joined: 31 Dec 2003
Posts: 334
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2004 4:48 pm Reply with quote

Did you consider fitting a few resistors oilman? Incidentally, in relation to the post by sws about his Stanley cooker humming, I have exactly the same problem. Due a service soon.
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oilman

from United Kingdom

Joined: 16 Sep 2003
Posts: 7965
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 26 times

PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2004 6:25 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Did you consider fitting a few resistors oilman?


I am intrigued. Where should I fit them, what value, what rating?

I assume the burner in your cooker is a Minor 1 model, either Monoflame or Ecoflam.
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BR

from Ireland

Joined: 31 Dec 2003
Posts: 334
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2004 11:09 pm Reply with quote

Let's not get into all that again icon_smile.gif icon_smile.gif
To be perfectly honest I haven't a clue what type of burner is in my cooker. I was just curious as to what might be causing this humming (only happens rarely). What makes the sound when the cooker is switched on and waiting to fire?
Is there a standard size of nozzle for these cookers. I notice the service man installs a 0.75mm one every time, however it often becomes blocked. (Could this be the cause of the problem) Somebody else told me that he always fits a 0.6mm. Does it matter provided the pump is properly set?
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oilman

from United Kingdom

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 5:30 am Reply with quote

The nozzle size and pump pressure would depend on whether you are using kerosene or diesel (class C2 or D) and how much heat you needed. Though I suspect you use kerosene. The manufacturer's information will give you a guide to the nozzle size. 0.75 seems a bit high. The air setting is adjusted to give correct combustion with given nozzle size and pump pressure.

Why do you think the nozzle becomes blocked? There is at least a tank strainer, the pump filter and nozzle filter to get through before it blocks the nozzle. If dirt is blocking the nozzle, I guess you have a steel tank. When did the service guy last clean the filter? You probably only have a strainer anyway. It would be worth having a replacable paper element filter as well, but it needs replacing when it's dirty. If it is nozzle blockage, the oilpipe needs flushing too.

Nozzle blockage is not good, but the damage to the pump from the dirt is likely to be expensive.
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BR

from Ireland

Joined: 31 Dec 2003
Posts: 334
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 8:21 pm Reply with quote

Thanks for your reply oilman, No, I have a plastic tank (kerosene) with two filters/strainers (units which have clear unscrewable bottoms) fitted to the pipe at the tank and before it enters the cooker.(I clean both annually, it is a very fine gauze but does not collect much) I'll speak to the service man the next time the range is due to be serviced. Maybe the blockage is being caused by dust/breakage etc. of the baffles (made of white dusty, irritating material) in the cooker. I donít know.

I would love to get your advice on something separate. We are about to build a new house approx 3500sq in size. My service man tell's me the double burner Stanley are the best on the market. However I know somebody else with a similar sized house that fitted a 'Boiler Energy Manager' with sensors (very small) in every room and had a separate boiler house attached to the house with a pretty large boiler. If you were building a house around the same size what system would you install? Thanks BR.
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oilman

from United Kingdom

Joined: 16 Sep 2003
Posts: 7965
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 26 times

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 10:31 pm Reply with quote

The strainers are 100 micron, paper filters are 20 micron. You can get elements to fit your filter bodies, and I recommend you fit one next to the boiler. The pump is set at about 110psi or more, and so dust from the baffles will not block the nozzle.

I now don't belive the problem is nozzle blockage.

Is your new house really 3500sq in? I see you live in the land of the little people, but I didn't think they were that small. I suggest a small blowlamp or even a large cigarette lighter. icon_lol.gif


However, assuming you're just trying to keep the inland revenue in the dark about your wealth, I would think the multi zone systems around might be worth looking at. There are a few about, so you could choose your own. For the boiler, these are almost always far too big for the building. I could never say any particular unit is the best on the market, they all have good and not so good points, and the Stanley is no exception.

Work out how much the heat losses are going to be on your house, then draw a graph of the mode temperature of the outside through the year and pick a temperature that's common rather than an extreme low. See how much heat you need to keep the house warm at this temperature (say 70-72 F) Then see what temp it will be at the extreme low. 60 to 65 would be ok in my opinion.I don't subscribe to the view that the heating should be able to keep the temperature at 70 high something, with the outside at well below freezing for a few days a year.

This will give you a size of boiler which will be working most of the time, rather than off most of the time. Have the pipes big enough too. If someone is designing it for you, ask what the maximum heat flow for the pipe size is, as most installations have pipes that can't take the heat away from the boiler as fast as the boiler can produce it. So why have the boiler?

For the few days when you need more heat, use a wood burning stove, much more cosy (or put another jumper on). (I wood say these are among the best).

If your house needs huge amounts of heat, more than 40kW, you can look at waste oil boilers by Kroll UK, but you need a low pressure air supply too.

I would have more than one heat source plumbed into the system, so you could have a Stanley cooker and a standard boiler (which could be a fairly small boiler). This is the unit for linking parts of the system.

Next I would consider using a thermal store (Albion, Gledhill and others). This stores the heat at low pressure, and allows you to have mains pressure hot water. (Not necessarily a good choice). Its great advantage if you care to configure it, is you can have radiators that don't go from hot to cold to hot, but you could use a variable speed pump to continuously vary the heat delivered so the radiators stay warm, the boiler then tops up the heat store.

I think that's enough for now, most of these thoughts are not the run of the mill installations, but those are usually a less than satisfactory cost driven solution to a critical system in a house.
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