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Wiring Dual Fuel Cooker


 
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scholesy

from United Kingdom

Joined: 23 Oct 2006
Posts: 54
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:35 pm Reply with quote

Hi All,
I've just bought a new dual fuel range cooker. I've arranged for a corgi engineer to connect the gas but was going to do the electric side of things myself. I have very little experience working with electrics etc.. so if I say anything too stupid please forgive me.

I currently have a built in electric cooker which runs to a cooker switch on the wall with additional plug socket and then onto the consumer unit were it has its own fuse rated at 30A.

The makers of the new oven have told me that the new cooker requires a 32A supply.

Now if I wish to keep the socket, (used for kettle and toaster), on the cooker switch what Ampage supply would I need? I was thinking maybe 40A. If so can i simply change the fuse on the consumer unit from 30A to 40A. Will cables need changing etc... Is it a bad idea to keep a plug socket on the Cooker supply?

Again apologies for any stupid questions any help appreciated, thanks, Andy
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Spark123

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:53 pm Reply with quote

One thing for certain, you must not just swop an MCB for a bigger one without knowing that the circuit can handle the additional load, this may mean the cable needs changed. In England/Wales the upgrading the circuit is notifiable to LABC under part p.
Does the cooker use the full 32A? What are the ratings on it?
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 2:01 pm Reply with quote

The 30A existing supply is very close to the 32A supply the makers mention. 30A is the old rating for rewirable fuses, and 32A is the "modern" equivalent used for MCBs. In itself, the 2A difference in rating does not require a change. Spark123 is right, you need to know the actual power rating of the new cooker.

For a Dual-fuel cooker (gas hob and electric ovens?) 32A is unusually high, does it have several ovens and grills? I doubt you will be in the habit of running them all at the same time, unless you have a restaurant.

It sounds like you are rather short of kitchen sockets; and if you have a 30A fuse your installation is probably rather old. I am not keen on cooker switches with incorporated plugsocket.

You might think about spending some of your money on upgrading the electrical installation.
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scholesy

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Joined: 23 Oct 2006
Posts: 54
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 4:00 pm Reply with quote

hanks for the quick replies,

OK i've got the spec sheet and added up the Powers from each of the ovens and the total power = 10.4kW
Not sure if this accounts for LED and lights etc...

The cookers a big one 7 gas hob/4 electric ovens. I'd have been happy with a microwave but my girlfriend insists she definately has to have this one icon_confused.gif

The installation does seem old, cooker switch\socket box has a nice yellow fag stained tint to it with a big red switch. To be honest I can afford to lose the socket if that would make things a lot easier.

thanks again
Andy
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 4:11 pm Reply with quote

That is more than 32A!

Are there any ovens where you can't have e.g. the grill on at the same time as the oven element? Or other things where you can't have 2 on at the same time?

Might be less trouble to get a new woman.
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FootSore

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Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 27
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 4:44 pm Reply with quote

JohnD wrote:
That is more than 32A!



Just posted my first question and already I can assist with an answer

10.4kW = 10400W

Amps = W/V

10400/240 = 43A

If they rate it as 32A then all ovens can't operate all at once. OR it has some fancy control that limits the maximum current to 32A. That is if all ovens are turned on from cold at once then they will not draw full current and will not heat up as quickly as if only one oven were turned on. Once up to temperature they will draw nothing like full current.

I only have a 63A main incomer, I'd have to cook in the dark!

FootSore
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scholesy

from United Kingdom

Joined: 23 Oct 2006
Posts: 54
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 5:13 pm Reply with quote

i'm considering the new woman option. icon_lol.gif

OK, on the specs sheets it states, 4 electric ovens:

1) Oven 1.3, Grill 2.6
2) Oven 2.3, Grill 1.7
3) Oven 2.3
4) Slow Cooker 0.2

i initially just added the lot to give a worst case but as you've stated it must be a case of you can only use say the oven and not the grill etc...

so recalculating I reckon 2.6 + 2.3 + 2.3 + 0.2 = 7.4kW
using A = W/V (thanks footsore) = 30.8
although i thought our voltage now ran at 230V unless i've picked that up wrong.
So what do you think?
thanks
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 5:29 pm Reply with quote

your 30A fuse is adequate for that cooker, but think about a general electrical upgrade due to age of current installation and shortage of sockets.
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securespark

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 5:39 pm Reply with quote

Yes, 230V is right for calculations. So that would be 32.17A.

You could use diversity, anyhow.
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scholesy

from United Kingdom

Joined: 23 Oct 2006
Posts: 54
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 5:54 pm Reply with quote

whats diversity?

OK, i'll go with the current 30A and look to upgrade/rewire house electrics.

I'll probably move the switch to behind a cabinet, how can I add extra cabling so that I can reposition the switch? Are their special cable joiners? Should all cabling be 6mm?

thanks
Andy
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