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    Rotted rafters

    Something possibly in my favour is that the decay seems to be in relatively new timber - so perhaps I'd get away with replacing that I'm intending to try and get a builder (ideally experienced in "heritage" properties!) to look round with me, but because it's an auction property the timing is...
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    Rotted rafters

    Well, the guide price for the house is quite very low, so hopefully if we have to spend a fortune on the roof we'll get the money back in increased value. I don't know what "very deep" means though - are we looking at £20k or £200k? It's a large, 3-bed C18 stone house in Cornwall. I'm still...
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    Rotted rafters

    Any thoughts? I guess one potential source of moisture would be condensation resulting from the heavy sarking restricting ventilation & blanket insulation on the floor making the void cold - but wouldn't the decay work down from where the timbers touch the sarking in that case?
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    Rotted rafters

    Sorry, I was using "rot" to refer to any decay - I'll edit to make clearer.
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    Rotted rafters

    Hi All, I went to see a property the other day which we're considering buying at auction. It's a couple of hundred years old & grade 2* listed. My main concern is the roof. There seems to be a mix of very old & newer timber. Lots of the rafters have the same problem: the lower third of the...
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    Matching decorative bathroom cladding

    Yes, but the cladding goes all round the room, behind the sink & toilet & is used to make a built-in storage unit so it would basically be an entire bathroom refit :( Looks like I might be running out of options... though I'll try a local mill (I've used Timbersource in Somerset before). Adam
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    Matching decorative bathroom cladding

    Thanks, looks like my purple option - I guess I might just have to accept it's not identical - but how did they make the original? [edit, after more googling] Ah, OK, I can't find a diagram of that bit but maybe it's "sideways" bits I need, thanks. (I'll do some more digging, but am now...
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    Matching decorative bathroom cladding

    I've never used a router so am struggling to picture how that would work. I can see how to make the curved (purple) and the straight (green) profiles separately, but how would it be possible to put them together to make the overall shape? (The lower section of the pic is my sketch of the...
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    Matching decorative bathroom cladding

    Anyone got any ideas? What tools would be used to machine a groove like that from scratch?
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    Nails or screws?

    Neither. They won't help with what you've got. Either rely on the slightly rickety arrangement you've built, or do as Munroist says. Adam
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    Matching decorative bathroom cladding

    Yes, that type of thing. But I can't see any information on those pages about the width of the sections & every example I have found is bigger - about 90mm seems standard and that's what those look like, as far as I can tell from the photos :( Adam
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    Matching decorative bathroom cladding

    Hi All, I need to match some existing decorative cladding but I've been searching for weeks and can't find anything similar. Pine or MDF, profiled or jointed, would all be fine. Anyone have any ideas where I could get it or how I could make it? The grooves are shaped like: ___/u\___. See pic...
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    New solid oak internal door - Teak oil or Osmo Door Oil?

    The leaflet it came with says it "can be finished with Danish oil, waxes, varnishes or hardwax finishes such as those supplied by Osmo or Treatex"
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    New solid oak internal door - Teak oil or Osmo Door Oil?

    Hi All, I've got a new solid oak door for an en-suite (so it might get the occasional splash or wet hand on it). I'm looking to keep the look fairly close to the natural wood - definitely not glossy. I've seen some recommendations for Osmo Door Oil but also have some left over teak oil I could...
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    Lights for hot location

    I finally got round to measuring the temperature where the lights will be and it only got up to 31 degrees - so I suspect I'm over-thinking the problem! I'll stick in some GU10 fittings and see what happens. Adam
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    Sealing soft stone windowsill

    Thanks. Yep, cement render. Perhaps it was just put on for cosmetic reasons. I'll take it off, clean up the stonework and see what happens...
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    Sealing soft stone windowsill

    Hi All, I've just discovered that what I thought was a concrete windowsill is actually stonework, covered with a kind of render. The stone is blue lias, which is pretty soft & flakes & deteriorates in exposed locations (where this is), which I suspect is why someone covered it up. However, if...
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    Lights for hot location

    Thanks for all the comments :) Fair question! I'm not sure. I can stand in there without expiring, so I'd judge it as technically "very hot airing cupboard" temperature ;) . Next time I have the fire on I'll find a thermometer... Thanks, good idea & they will be concealed & I already have...
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    Lights for hot location

    Hi All, I'd like to install some lights (perhaps a couple of wall-mounted spotlights) in a large inglenook fireplace. The air where they'll be gets pretty warm and I've read about LEDs not coping with heat so would like to use halogens. However, it's pretty hard to get hold of halogen GU10s, so...
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    Blocked shower waste + awkward pipework

    Thanks all, that's really helpful. I'll give it a go this weekend. (~5m straight run inside)
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