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1930's rewire

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by mastersc, 1 Nov 2021.

  1. mastersc

    mastersc

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    Just bought a 1930's house and it needs basically gutting and rewiring. So with this we are looking to modernise. It has thick walls and I notice the wifi doesn't get too far, so thinking cabled and a mesh system.

    Initial thoughts

    1. Enough plug sockets per room
    2. Do you need a network socket in each room?
    3. best way to wire a TV over a fireplace?
    4. Addition of external outside sockets.


    Any hints,tips, do's and don't to consider during the upgrade process to make sure we don't end up missing anything. A contractor will be doing the works.
     
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  3. RandomGrinch

    RandomGrinch

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  4. winston1

    winston1

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    1. Twice as many as you think you will need.
    2. Possibly but do you know where in the room you want it. Not a sparks job though.
    3. Don't. A TV over a fireplace can have a short life due to rising heat from the fire. Also it will be too high for viewing and you will get a crick in the neck. Wherever you put the TV allow for an aerial and dual satellite connection. Job far a CAI registered installer, not a sparks.
    4. Good idea. One at the front for lawn mower and vacuuming the car, even slow charging an EV. Double at the back for lawn mower and other things.
     
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  5. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    (1), (2) and (4) are questions that only you can really answer, but you would be advised to decide what you think you might need, and then add on an appreciably 'excess' to cover the things (present or future) that you may not have anticipated.

    As for (3), whilst many (probably 'millions') do it, some people would advise you not to (if the fireplace is used as a fireplace), since electronic things don't last their longest when exposed to appreciable heat.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  6. ericmark

    ericmark

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    The problem is cost, and it will vary from firm to firm, but no good asking each to different amount of work. Also speed, when I came to have mothers house rewired I realised it could not be done while she was living there. If rewiring with people living in the house there is a safety and a logistics problem, keeping a freezer powered for example.

    I had the qualifications to DIY, but it was going to cost around £600 a week for mother in a care home, so cheaper to get a firm in who could do it all in a week. Most days two men, but Friday we had around six. If you need to leave the house while it is being rewired then speed needs to be considered, and although I would agree with @winston1 that network and TV is not a basic sparks job, both my son and I have both trained in setting up a LAN and also both hold our RAE and have been trained how to build and install aerials so it does depend on who you go to, some may be able to do it all, which saves lifting floor boards twice. And means can be faster.

    Some things will make a difference to price, and there is not a simple answer as to what is required, I for example have selected an all RCBO consumer unit, but cheap make, many use just two RCD's maybe however more expensive make. Some times there is no option, depends on supply type, I stipulated all sockets to be on a ring with mother's house with the whole idea of adding extra latter.

    I also said trunking allowed in room corners and where there was already trunking for central heating, but any cables away from corners to be buried. And one wall was papered, agreed no sockets on that wall. It is easy to re-plaster a painted wall, but wall paper need stripping or you end up with a proud fill so can't strip paper in future without sanding walls.

    Some sparks will make good, others expect you to get decorators after, so you need to decide what you want them to do. I did making good as could do that with mother home, but could not have floor boards up with mother home.
     
  7. oldbutnotdead

    oldbutnotdead

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    Network sockets all over the place.
    If you have the space to duct your AV cables back to a central point then do it, who knows what cable standard we'll be on in 10 years time.
    Have you got/are you planning on a mancave/gin shed/hot tub out the back? If yes provide ducting for power and data while you're hacking the place about.
     
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  8. SUNRAY

    SUNRAY

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    1. (y)
    2. ??? why is it not a sparks job?
    3. (y) but commonly put above the fireplace. In my experience registered installers are no better than joe public, they way they throw cables ofver the roof, tywrap to anything that might happen to be handy rather than got the clips out, put a hint of SA tape on plugs/joints and can't be a***d to protect the rubber from the weather, the list goes on.
    4. (y) As appropriate
     
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  9. wgt52

    wgt52

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    No.1. 4 at main TV point, 2 at other TV points. rest of house as others have said twice as many as you think you need. 2 or 3 rings (ground floor, first floor, Kitchen)
    No.2. excellent idea. As a Minimum - 1 per TV point, 2 in kids rooms, 2 in study/office, 1 in Kitchen, 1 with every telephone point (with the proposed changed to D2A taking place at the home you can use the lan cable for 'phone connectivity). Find somewhere you can put a distribution board and the router/hub.
    No.3. don't bother - short life of kit, neck ache.
    No.4. others have answered that best
     
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  11. SUNRAY

    SUNRAY

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    • squabbling posts are not helpful. Some posts have been removed.
    .
     
  12. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    The best way to wire a TV over a fireplace is not to, and to put it low down in a corner.
     
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  13. ed110220

    ed110220

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    Yeah, I often wonder why I often see TVs mounted high up on a wall sometimes above a fireplace. Looks strange and must give the viewers a crick in the neck. I took out our fireplace and chimney breast to rearrange the living room and avoid this problem.

    As for sockets, I think it's a good idea to have at least one "free" and easily accessible in each room so you don't have to scrabble under/behind furniture to plug a vacuum cleaner in.
     
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  14. mattylad

    mattylad

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    Most TV stands I have seen raise the TV about 2 foot from the floor.

    I'm pretty sure that this is for a reason, mainly because this is the optimal viewing angle when sat on a sofa/chair.
    Putting the TV high on the wall is I feel, uncomfortable.
     
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  15. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    I really despise the idea of burying TV cables in walls, inevitably the cables will become obsolete and be a pain to replace.

    However there are options,

    Obviously the TV aerial and satellite cables can be buried in the wall easily, o always find it neat to use proper face plates on these.

    In terms of other cables, I would put a couple of optical cables for the price and size of them even if they don't get used it's no big thing. HDMI cables, this is the one that I struggle to agree with burying in the wall. This cable is regularly updated with new features and standards become obsolete quite quickly, that being said the latest standard should be ok for a few years being capable of 8k which isn't mainstream and likely won't be for a long time. However it's still a pain in the bum trying set these cables in the wall, it might be worth looking into fibre optic to HDMI converter, it's expensive, but long term might be worth it.

    As for plug sockets...

    The master bedroom wants a double socket either side of the bed, I would advise making these usb sockets aswell. Where the wife is going to have her hair dryer etc or a dressing table, or wherever the mirror will be placed, I would advise have a double socket here also. If your having a TV in the bedroom, put a double socket and an Ariel socket here also.

    The landing can do with just a single socket for plugging in the hoover.

    The other rooms I would advise on drawing a layout of the room on paper and placing furniture, use engineering/graph paper for this and scale the squares, by doing this you'll be able to work out where best to place the sockets and switches.

    Also think about smart light switches, if you go for smart light switches most require a neutral at the socket. You can just use smart bulbs however, jury is out as to which is best, so I'd advise you do a bit of research, now would be the ideal time to think about this.

    Also think of kitchen layouts, where are you going to need the oven/cooker feeds.

    Lastly home security, is advise wired fire alarms. Also think whether you want to install home security, again now would be the time to run the cables a wired home security system is better than a wireless.

    Not everything has to be installed at once, but any wires should be installed and tidied out the way until such time funds allow to have these nice extras installed.
     
  16. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I agree - my main TV is quite low, the bottom being only about 18", if that, from the floor.

    However, it seems that, for many decades, people seem to have been reasonably comfortable having to look significantly upwards at a cinema screen (particularly if they are in 'the front row'!) - so perhaps it doesn't matter too much?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  17. Robin0577

    Robin0577

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    As a minimum! (OK, maybe not in the bathroom) I put in 4 behind my TV / Hi-Fi area and I now wish I'd put more in because I've had to add a small network switch there.
     
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