2.5mm cable for extra sockets

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Distance from board to oven around 40ft on a 5 kw oven
 
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10mm cable often supplies a whole house.
"Often" would be a stretch. In fact the DNO (at least here) wouldn't even allow it nowadays.

To be fair, 60A service fuses are no longer common. 80A would be more usual.
 
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JohnD

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I ran a 2 ft 2.5mm cable from 1 socket for convenience. The existing 2 sockets that this runs off won't be used as they are now behind built in oven.
eh?

draw a diagram please.
 
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eh? draw a diagram please.
I may be wrong, but I think he's saying that his new socket is a 'spur off a spur', but what it's spurred from is an unfused spur, which is now unusable because it is now behind a built-in oven.

'Strict adherence to regs' aside, I would personally say that it would be pretty pedantic to criticise the new socket because it was 'a spur from a spur' (given that what it's spurred from is effectively a JB - so, if there is any reason for quibbling, it's probably because some may regard the originating socket (used as a JB) as now being 'inaccessible' and therefore should theoretically be 'MF'.

However, as said, I may be misunderstanding.

Kind Regards, John
 
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He said the 2.5mm will overheat, I believe it's on a 20A fuse.
Just wondering, if the circuit is protected by a 20A fuse/breaker would this be indicative that it is indeed a radial. The op stated that there is already 2 cables in the existing socket so may be already extended. Perhaps the electrician was concerned that adding a further socket to the radial could cause overload to the cable, admittably only if the size of the fuse/breaker was increased, maybe at a later date when it started tripping.
 
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Just wondering, if the circuit is protected by a 20A fuse/breaker would this be indicative that it is indeed a radial.
One imagines so, since it would be particularly stupid to protect a 2.5mm² ring final with a 20A fuse/breaker - but, there again, people sometimes do do 'particularly stupoid' things :)
The op stated that there is already 2 cables in the existing socket so may be already extended. Perhaps the electrician was concerned that adding a further socket to the radial could cause overload to the cable, admittably only if the size of the fuse/breaker was increased, maybe at a later date when it started tripping.
Unless the cable is buried in thermal insulation or somesuch, it's current-carrying-capacity will be at least 20A, in which case there would be no risk of the cable being 'overloaded' if it is protected by a 20A fuse/breaker, regardless of how many sockets there are.

Kind Regards, John
 
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The op stated that there is already 2 cables in the existing socket so may be already extended. Perhaps the electrician was concerned that adding a further socket to the radial could cause overload to the cable, admittably only if the size of the fuse/breaker was increased, maybe at a later date when it started tripping.

Unless the cable is buried in thermal insulation or somesuch, it's current-carrying-capacity will be at least 20A, in which case there would be no risk of the cable being 'overloaded' if it is protected by a 20A fuse/breaker, regardless of how many sockets there are.
;)
 
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.... "... Perhaps the electrician was concerned that adding a further socket to the radial could cause overload to the cable, only if the size of the fuse/breaker was increased, maybe at a later date when it started tripping....." ;)
Who knows what the electrician may have been concerned about? -:)

However, it would be pretty ridiculous to be concerned about an "only if..." scenario such as you mention - since the cable of any sockets circuit could theoretically be overloaded if the size of the fuse/breaker was increased (to an inappropriately high value) in the future. One simply cannot take into account all the incorrect (even crazy) changes that theoretically could be made to the circuit in the future.

Kind Regards, John
 
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One imagines so, since it would be particularly stupid to protect a 2.5mm² ring final with a 20A fuse/breaker - but, there again, people sometimes do do 'particularly stupoid' things :)
All the rings (and yes they were rings) in my parents house were on 15A rewirable fuses for over a decade, they rewired the place when they moved in but did not replace the fusebox at the time.

I don't think the fuses for the upstairs and downstairs rings ever blew, the one for the kitchen did blow occasionally.

More recently I've also seen youtube electrians reduce circuits to 20A as a quick fix when broken rings or chains of spurs off spurs are discovered.
 

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