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30a connector block, how can I tell

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by robpeake, 3 May 2021.

  1. SUNRAY

    SUNRAY

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    Are there going to be doors on the wardrobe?

    May have to remove the skirting to avoid clash, also the glass may clash too.
     
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  3. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    True - but, as someone else said, I would not be concerned about 'safe zones', given that no-one is likely to be drilling through the mirror in the future. However, as I've just written, I would be concerned about any type of electrical joint (other than soldered) behind a massive 'stuck on' mirror.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  4. robpeake

    robpeake

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    no, they want them open (madness) as she is a teenager and its going to be aright mess but they want them open :)
     
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  5. SUNRAY

    SUNRAY

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    I think in the circumstances the glass creates a psuedo vertical safety zone and the new socket creates the horizontal. On that basis solder is the way to go, Personally I'd prefer to see both cables extended into the new socket rather than the spur.
     
  6. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Why?
     
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  7. SUNRAY

    SUNRAY

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    Future testing/faultfinding/maintaining service if something does go wrong and let's face it 2 joints isn't really any more work than one.
     
  8. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    As I've just written to you, I would not be concerned about 'safe zones' in this situation, but I would not want anything other than soldered joints behind that mirror.
    I fear that would involve even more 'inaccessible' joints/JBs/whatever behind the mirror.

    I don't really know why some people are so concerned about 'spurs', given that the same people are usually happy with branching radials.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  9. 333rocky333

    333rocky333

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    Is there a room behind, drill through low level and reroute the wires and do whatever in there
     
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  11. SUNRAY

    SUNRAY

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    I'm agreeing with you regarding the 'safe zone' created by the mirror and the soldered joints.

    Having too much experience of innaccessible joints and their failings, ie if one joint were to fail that socket will fail.
    I've fallen totally out of love with hidden junctions. My preference is for hidden joints to be simple, ie not junctions and therefore I'll extend both cables whenever possible. That way if any one joint were to fail the other cable is still available to continue some sort of service, which may be as simple as isolating the faulty cable and reducing the fuse down to 20A as opposed to losing power at that location.

    This is one of those rare situations where more joins potentially improves reliability.

    My own preference is to avoid spurs on ring finals as they can so easily be abused, my current home had a ring final of only three sockets and one FCU however there were about a dozen other outlets formed by spurs feeding several sockets from the ring points and silly numbers of JB's.
     
  12. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I would not personally have that concern with soldered 'junctions' (which I take to mean a joining of 3 or more conductors) but, as I said, I would do all I could to avoid any sort of totally inaccessible 'joining of conductors' - as I wrote ...
    It may be your 'preference' but, provided they are installed in a sensible and 'compliant' fashion, what sort of potential 'abuse' of spurs are you concerned about? If you are merely worried that they could be altered (e.g. added to) in a non-compliant (maybe even 'idiotic') fashion in the future, that is equally true of so many other things - and one really cannot 'plan for idiots'.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  13. studentspark

    studentspark

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    Not an ideal situation, having to bury a join, but it happens all the time, sometimes you can over stress it.

    Since you can make that hole as big as you need, I would of used one of these 32 A Ashley MF junction boxes.

    Box secures to the wall and good clamps on cable. Used these under floors.


    Safe zones is one thing. I would be more concerned about verifying the circuit is healthy to start off with.
    That the conductors are continuous, that its not already a spur. Zs, R2 and RCD times are acceptable, before connecting the spur.
    But you need a meter !
    Then retesting the same at the new socket. Making sure polarity is right. and values were as before, so you know your join is acceptable.

    Only then would I be happy to see it buried. Half hour job for an electrician. Save you the worry

    ASJ803-1.jpg
     
  14. mattylad

    mattylad

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    As it's being covered with a mirror, I would get a sharpie and draw on the wall where those cables are, the last thing you want is for someone fitting a big mirror to whack a screw into one of them.

    Yes they should know where safe zones are but a little marking helps.
     
  15. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    Would we be worrying about a big picture being put on the wall?

    No, we wouldn't.

    Can we interpret the regs the way we want to?

    Possibly.
     
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  16. Astra99

    Astra99

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    You can buy a very thin blanking plate from Toolstation, part number 15756 priced at £4.57.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Would a big picture be "stuck" (and also probably screwed) to the wall?

    Kind Regards, John
     
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