a compound mitre saw conversion?

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Hello, so I am autistic and have some random things pop into my head.

I am extremely accident prone, example would be some 20 years ago, I had something that came in my head and I have to do what enters my head else it just boils over and I can't cope well. I decided that I was going to put a fish pond in our front garden, one end would be the deep pool area, and the other end would flow like a mini stream down slightly into the main pool, with a bridge going over the top of it. I was going to make the pool area about 2sq meters and the stream about 3meters long, no more than 5" wide. However I decided to do this all at 11pm. I keep spraining my angle and had many operations since 2008 to fix, and I sprained my ankle and put the garden folk right into the joint of my ankle. Another time, I was asked to cop some wood using an axe, never done this before and was happy to give it a go. I completely missed the wood, and hit my leg...

Anyway I knew I am accident prone, so I got a non sliding mitre saw a couple months ago, as I knew if I went for a sliding one, it would be more dangerous and as I have never used a mitre saw before I thought it would be best to not go for the sliding one. I plan, maybe a year or 2 to invest (if needed) into a more higher quality one and a slider one too... but that wont be for 3-5 years minimum.

So, I thought would and is it possible to make my non sliding saw into a sliding saw?
 
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no as it has rails to run on

many sliding saws can be locked in the chop only position
personally i would find a local group or collage course to give you supervised training in the use off powertools
not because they wont trust you but because you can and will get safety training a supervising eye and help to decide which powertools you are best matched to and which ones you should avoid iff possible
in general with power tools you need full attention and know you mind wont wander at a time off danger
 
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Oh most defiantly, my main problem with going to collage to learn how to use all the correct tools is I am also disabled my ankle is shot and pain is extreme, to the point if the doctor said we can remove my leg to stop the pain I would defiantly say yes and order a tent and camp outside hospital ready to be done. So going into college where I wont be able to go either due to pain or the high spike that I get with extremely strong pain meds I take.

I only been doing bits here and there and only when I have not taken any liquid morphine, but have taken my tablet morphine - this allows me to funtion at a good level. Anything slightly off, say I am tired then I 100% don't do anything... from DIY to socialising,
 
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Please, and take this the right way, avoid using power tools and find a safer interest. There are so many opportunities to cause yourself serious damage with power tools, it only takes a second of inattention and you are likely to have an accident.

If you like DIY and making things, why not look at model making? much can be done with hand tools, and small power tools like dremels and scroll saws. The advantage is if you make a mistake with these small tools, you are only likely to get a cut, rather than lose a finger, or worse, a hand.
 
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Theoretically possible to convert a mitre saw into a slider but in practice you would be building it from scratch.

Blup
 
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Hello, Yes I was aware about having to call it a day on any DIY stuff before I even got started, however I found out that if and a BIG IF I took things slowly, mostly due to pain, but I am able to do most things that I would like. I have the supervision of my mum who is a former school site manager/caretaker who has the experience of nearly every trade going.

It was my mum who said if I really wanted to get a mitre saw, not to get a sliding one at the moment due to myself never using one, and the non sliding mitre saw I can easily keep my fingers and body parts away from the blade that is just going up and down, with a sliding one, there is more risk.

I don't do anything without supervision and I try and keep away from things that would require hand eye coordination (like chopping wood with an axe). This is where my mum takes over and does things for me.

Last year, it took me a while but I managed to build a built-in BBQ outdoor kitchen, (I started in April and finished in September.


I didn't know if there was a "kit" or something that would convert my mitre saw into a sliding one, so in the future if I needed or was comfortable enough I could at least try and see if I was able to use safely, if not I would just put it back to non sliding... (this would also save having 2 mitre saws). Maybe I could rent one? in a couple years?
 
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Hi,
I was wondering how disciplined you can be when it comes to using machinery?
There are ways of making a safe system of work for most situations.
If you have a decent workspace, I would consider mounting the saw on a workbench and investing in some clamps to fix down the workpieces.
If your workpieces and the saw are firmly attached, you will only need one hand to operate the saw - tuck your other hand behind you, in your belt! :)
Alternatively, another 'ON' switch (Dead man's handle) could be installed - i.e. one hand has to hold the 'ON' switch while the other operates the saw. Keeping both hands occupied and well away from the blade can really reduce the risk of an incident; the saw can't be accidently triggered either :)
 
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If you're not used to mitre saws to disconnect the power until the wood has been set up and clamped on the saw table. One of the more dangerous stages in the set up process is running the blade over the pencil/ cut line to get it lined up perfectly or for shaving off slivers off the timber end. Your hand will be on the saw handle and it is easy to accidentally trigger the switch. Only restore the power when you're ready to cut. If you take your time over things that should generally help in the safety process.

Blup
 
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Hello, Yes this is exactly what I am doing... okay maybe not exactly, but when I need to use the mitre saw, I set it all up, make sure that everything is aligned and "bolted" down, so all I would have to do is press the trigger and pull it down... again using one hand. I then have my mum stand a couple feet away with the power cable in a extension cord and ready to connect, I then make the cut and then mum would unconnect it.

A prime example of this being used was that I was using a jig saw and the tightening bolt broke off, and mum saw it happening and unplugged it before anything would happen. It was a brand new jig saw too, but the bolt broke off and we had to make a new one - by make I mean go though mums box of bolts and find a replacement.

I was only sawing though MDF so there was a defect in the bolt that was used to hold the blade in the jigsaw itself.

My mum (and dad (at a different place of work) - who are divorced) were both health and safety officers for their area of work - mums was in schools - 4 total, and my dad was at a animal feed/farm supply warehouse and distribution centre, so my mum knows all the risks of everything and I even have a safety gloves, face shields and ear protections. I have everything setup with safety in mind, and when my leg hurts more than normal and I have taken more morphine than normal I don't do anything, not even doing simple screwing.

Yes, I did say morphine, and I do have quite a bit of it daily, but I have it in 2 different types. I take 120mg every 12 hours that allows me to stand and basic walking around the house and any small jobs. I then take "top-up" morphine (this is what makes me drowsy, more clumsy and dangerous using tools/driving etc (btw I don't drive), so I don't ever do any DIY stuff on those days.



You may ask, why am I wanting to do this type of thing... simple really, I am autistic and I worship my cats, if it wasn't for my cats I wouldn't be here, since I got my cats, my autism is controlled, and life seems easier - but only March last year, one of my cats died (was healthy) and this has screwed my head up badly, but I found that building my BBQ kitchen last year it kept my head busy of all the bad thoughts, and sadly my eldest cat became ill and was put to sleep and it kills me... this was back in October, but I feel like I let him down. (I am even getting really upset typing this) but keeping or at least trying to keep my head busy with things like building stuff, is keeping my head clear.

I brought a mitre saw back in February, knowing that I am unsafe with more moving parts, I got a non sliding one, with the option of upgrading in a couple of years if I felt comfortable with the one I brought.
 
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Hello, Yes this is exactly what I am doing.
Then, it seems as if you have a very good system in place (along with your mum!).
And as long as you stick with the system (and you could consider an extra electrical interlock), then I don't see the risk being significantly higher with a sliding mitre saw.
Keep practicing and see how you get on! :)
 
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Yes, I did say morphine, and I do have quite a bit of it daily, but I have it in 2 different types. I take 120mg every 12 hours that allows me to stand and basic walking around the house and any small jobs. I then take "top-up" morphine (this is what makes me drowsy, more clumsy and dangerous using tools/driving etc (btw I don't drive), so I don't ever do any DIY stuff on those days.

Please do not think that I am judging you, that really isn't my intention. I have used synthetic opiates post operations, and if I am being totally honest my (excessive) love of alcohol resulted in me ditching my oxycodone (the two were not compatible- If I had more than two pints after my operation, I felt really bad). I recently listened to the Radio 4 adaptation of Empire of Pain.


Synthetic opiates play a really important roll in pain relief but their effectiveness wears off, leading patients to take higher doses that have less effect. I respectfully suggest that, if you haven't already, you look at alternative forms of pain relief. I would imagine that there are forums where other people that have the same, or similar conditions may be able to offer advice (that may or may not help).

I appreciate that I don't understand your pain and please accept my post as being advice from someone that has his own "addictions". In no way am I judging you. I am an old git though that has seen much.
 

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