Am I ok with this wall light?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by TNDU, 5 Jan 2021.

  1. TNDU

    TNDU

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    Sorry if this is a trivial question but I have looked at the info on the net and it doesn't really the answer the question, so would like to hear from the experts on here!

    I have a wall light that needs replacing. I currently use the traditional incandescent 60W bulbs. I have a few of these and want to continue using them even though I know they are not energy efficient but that is not important right now :)

    What I would like advice/opinion on is whether this one from John Lewis will work for my traditional bulbs. I have the same bulb fittings SES but I worry about the electrical load on the wiring within the lamp. The one on JL site states recommended 4W LED bulbs, which is equivalent to 40W incandescent bulbs.

    Will the wiring be safe in the lamp for me to load a 60W incandescent bulb?

    https://www.johnlewis.com/john-lewi...tivityid=793e55fb-07e5-4c22-a89f-e5285a37d2b8
     
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  3. ericmark

    ericmark

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    It says
    so it would seem they can be used. The problem is some bulbs in quartz envelopes can allow white hot bits to escape and land on carpets etc. So some lamps for example using G9 bulbs need glass globes when using quartz options which are not required with LED options, but in the main with SES (also called E14) there is a built in glass envelope around the quartz so there is no problem.
     
  4. TNDU

    TNDU

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    Thanks. My knowledge is not good enough to understand what you are explaining. My concern is with the power rating on the wiring. I don't want to burn the damn lamps out by shoving a 60W bulb into a lamp that is designed to only hold a 40W bulb, if we refer to old traditional bulbs.

    I found this article online about equivalents lumiers between the different types of bulbs, from which I have ascertained that the JL lamps are designed to accommodate up to 40W traditional bulbs, but I want to use a 60W traditional bulb and would like to know if this is safe to do so. Unless I have not understood the article correctly and so I have made the wrong assumptions from the article.

    https://ledhut.co.uk/blogs/news/led-equivalent-wattages-against-traditional-lighting
     
  5. terryplumb

    terryplumb

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    You should adhere to the limitations that the manufacturer specified on bulb wattages.
    The wiring will no doubt be upto carrying the current that a 60watt bulb draws, the additional heat that it generates may be detrimental however.
     
  6. TNDU

    TNDU

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    thank you. i know that lamps always have a label on the bulb holder to state the maximum wattage for the bulb, which is either 40W, 60W or 100W. I had put this down to the size of wiring that has been used inside the lamp itself but what you are saying is that the lamp has been built of a material that can not withstand the high amount of heat generated by the corresponding bulbs, and that this is what is driving these instructions on the lamp bulb holders?

    that as far as the electrical wiring is concerned, I can put a 60W bulb into a lamp that states maximum of 40W, except for the fact that the resulting heat may damage the material that had been used to make the lamps?
     
  7. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    When they mention "equivalent to" they mean the light output and nothing to do with the Wattage; obviously 4W is not equivalent to 40W, it is one tenth.

    Your light details state 18W halogen candle "recommended" so it depends why they are recommending that.
     
  8. TNDU

    TNDU

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    Yes, whilst replying to ericmark, i did wonder if I am mixing up the lumiere with the wattage, hence my comment about me not understanding the LED Hut article. Unfotunately the JL lamps don't refer to traditional incandescent bulbs and only to the new ones. I don't think their halogen bulbs are what is referred to as incandescent bulbs in the LED Hut article. The old traditional filament bulbs. I think the JL halagen bulbs are different to traditional filament bulbs as 18W is far too low for your bog standard filament bulbs.
     
  9. terryplumb

    terryplumb

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    Pretty much. Why the manufacturer recommends it ,is for them to answer. But it's nowt to do with the wirings capability not to be able to carry the current drawn by a 60 watt bulb .
     
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  11. ericmark

    ericmark

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    Halogen slightly hotter than standard pearl candle bulb so 20 watt standard pearl bulb would be OK, as would a clear 20 watt, but not a 40 watt as would be too hot. As LED you could fit a 7 watt without problem even when it says 4 watt. But likely you would not find it that much brighter.

    My living room I would guess was designed to have a 100 watt lamp, maybe 150 watt, and the light would reflect off the ceiling as well as direct from bulb, but an LED bulb only shines down [​IMG] so there simply is no LED equivalent to the 100 watt tungsten as you need at least two bulbs one facing up and one facing down, so the simple pendent is swapped for a chandelier to get the spread required, and instead of a BA22d bulb they are fitted with SES so you can't buy a 15 watt SES in LED I found around 6 watt at a reasonable price, so I have 8 x 6 watt SES (470 x 8 = 3760 lumen) to replace one 150 watt tungsten (2600 lumen) so in real terms the LED is 1/3 of the tungsten wattage, never found a 150 watt tungsten to try, but the 8 x 6 watt LED are not really bright enough to read in the room, I use a standard lamp to supplement them.

    It is claimed Lumen is what the eye can see with the light, but the human eye can see more with orange light than white, so that does not really compute.
     
  12. TNDU

    TNDU

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  13. rsgaz

    rsgaz

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    But they only state the 'recommended' wattage. You need to email them and ask what the maximum wattage is for incandescent lamps.

    This will be written on a sticker somewhere on the lamp and in the installation instructions. Maybe even on the outside of the box.
     
  14. TNDU

    TNDU

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    thanks. i did look into contacting them, but there doesn't seem to be any way to do so, except call them and they won't be anwering the phone in the lock down.
     
  15. rsgaz

    rsgaz

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  16. TNDU

    TNDU

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  17. SUNRAY

    SUNRAY

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    If only it was this easy.
    Father in law lives in sheltered accomodation and when the ceiling lamp blew about 5 years ago they replaced it with a 7W CFL and the moaning started. OK so he is currently 97 with one working eye and that is not so good these days, not being aware of what was in there before [he says CFL] we tried 11W, 20W and even 30W CFL's and different colours [the difference in light levels between 20W & 30W CW is truly astounding!] and then moved on to a selection of LED's and halogen. We tried different shades and no shade. None worked for him and i have to say each time we got him to read something which he moved around to catch the light.

    He decided he needed a standard lamp behind his chair, we fitted a 40W halogen and straight away it was the best thing since sliced bread.

    Just before Christmas the 20W CW CFL started flickering, I took my 'box of assorted bulbs' which also contained some I'd recently removed from a building being reburbished. There were all sorts in there, I fitted a similar CFL and tried the read test then tried a 100W incandescent 'Too bright' tried a 60W 'that's better' he then sat there and sorted through the box reading the faded markings with ease. I have to say I didn't disagree with him.

    I don't think it's just the lumens that counts.
     
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