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Another bit of Science Fiction come true

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Lincsbodger, 14 Jun 2010.

  1. Lincsbodger

    Lincsbodger

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    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/06/10/super_small_magnet/

    The invention of the hand held MRI SCanner, otherwise known as a "Tricorder" in Star Trek, is just around the corner.

    Science Fiction is pretty good at predicting the future, which is why i believe man WILL invent a way to colonize the stars and spread across the galaxy.
     
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  3. lifesagasman

    lifesagasman

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    ...But not tonight, lincs, I have a headache...
     
  4. ColJack

    ColJack

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    no need to invent a way..
    we could do it now..
    we have the technology to build large ships in space from modules ( ISS ).

    the only problem is that it would have to be a generational ship as it would take several lifetimes to get to the nearest star system.

    no one has yet studied the effects of space flight on human feotal growth, or indeed the long term effects of severely prolonged low gravity on the human body.

    would centrifical gravity be sufficient to stave off the muscle degeneration that astronaughts currently experience?

    would we be able to make super strong humans simply by increasing the gravity gradually during their childhood?
     
  5. namsag

    namsag

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    Lincsbodger no surprises there if you have read about gene roddenberry and the council of 9.
    Everything in star trek will be possible to us as it already is to others ;)
     
  6. Mickymoody

    Mickymoody

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    I find the sliding door from Star Trek problematic, that are employed by supermarkets, if they are closing, as you approach, they often stall, and fail to open, unless you break your stride, and wait for them to reset, and open again. Rotary doors at supermarkets are Klingon based, obviously, as you have to shuffle round slowly, if you are too quick they stall also, smaller rotary doors can revolve too quickly, and are hard to enter. I prefer a door on a hinge, that opens traditionally. Hand held MRI scanners? I don't see Star Trek refer to garlic bread, and apparently THAT's the future, but don't see the Trekkies eating it? :LOL:
     
  7. joe-90

    joe-90

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    The hand held scanner is a simple device and doesn't need to break the rules of science to operate. Colonising the universe does.
     
  8. sooey

    sooey

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    Even in star trek Scotland will NEVER win the world cup. :LOL: :LOL: :LOL:
     
  9. Lincsbodger

    Lincsbodger

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    Nah, they will always lose to the Romulans.
     
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  11. Space cat

    Space cat

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    That's true.

    Well maybe not several lifetimes but, thanks to a world shortage of dilithium, we don't have warp drive so this would be no five year mission. You wouldn't expect to come back home in your own lifetime. It would have to be a travelling space colony.


    There are two ways to simulate gravity and both could be used. Firstly, you make the ship wheel-shaped with its inhabitants in the outer ring. In the absence of engine thrust, you set it rotating at the right speed to simulate 1g at the circumference. Secondly, you need propulsion to get anywhere. If you set the engines to deliver a constant acceleration of 1g along the wheel axis, you can turn off the rotation. Things would get a bit weird as you changed over from one to the other but there are ways around this. :cool: :cool: :cool:

    I think it would take many generations before we saw any significant change. :( :( :(

    There are two outstanding problems:

    1) Could this relatively small colony survive without going mad? This is not a trivial question and it's being investigated right now.

    2) What do we use for fuel. There isn't much uranium drifting around out there so the engines would have to be fusion powered. This may be possible before long using lithium and deuterium but they are also in short supply. The only fuel we can reasonably expect to find out in interstellar space is hydrogen - and not much of it either. Despite the problems, I'm sure it will be possible some day. :) :) :)
     
  12. ColJack

    ColJack

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    why would it take several generations?
    if, from birth you were in a higher gravity environment, your bone structure and musculature would be denser to counteract the inctrease, just as people who weight train and do physical jobs have denser bones and more muscle.


    the fastest currently available means of propulsion was a probe sent towards the sun, that atained a speed of 240,000km/h, mainly by gravity from the sun..
    if we traveled at that speed to the nearest star, proxima centauri, then it would take 19,000 years..

    if we step into theoretical ( but plausible ) means of propulsion like nuclear pulse propulsion, then it would take 85 years.. so unless you're born on board, the people who set off would likely never get there.

    assuming that the crew are having kids at age 20, it's highly unlikely that even the second generation of the crew would get there alive..
     
  13. Space cat

    Space cat

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    That's fair enough. I thought you were talking about genetic changes. The propulsion bit goes like this:

    Using a rocket engine we haven't invented yet, you accelerate your ship at a constant 1g. Ignoring relativistic effects for the moment, this will get you up to 100,000,000 m/s in about 118 days. That's Earth days, which will cease to be relevant. Space colony days could be a bit longer so that everybody gets a lie-in every day :D :D :D - but I digress. You are now moving at around one third light speed so relativity can't be ignored much longer. If you leave the engine running you'll gain a diminishing return in velocity for your fuel consumption. On the other hand your clocks will slow down. I think it's best to maintain full thrust until you're half way there but I can't be bothered to prove it right now. The point is that you could get to another star in less than twelve years. :cool: :cool: :cool:

    Your biggest problem will be finding that elusive 'M-class' planet. You might be star hopping for a long time. :( :( :( You can improve your chances by building more ships as you go, taking the materials from whatever planets, moons or asteroids you can find. Come to think of it, if the history of man's life here on Earth is anything to go by, you'll need the extra ships to hold your rapidly expanding population! :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
     
  14. heatingman

    heatingman

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    Well at least there would be a regular supply of fresh (ish) meat to eat on the way, or fuel to keep te aga going. The must be loads of ways of recycling a redundant space traveller.
     
  15. sooey

    sooey

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    For every one you throw out the back you get a little shove forward. So if you had enough of them you could use them as a propellant. :LOL:
     
  16. Space cat

    Space cat

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    Gruesome though it may sound, everything on a space colony has to be recycled. It happens here on Earth too but we pretend not to notice.

    One of the problems you face is the gradual loss of mass because something has to be ejected from the back, even if it's pure energy. You'll need to scoop up whatever mass you can find along the way - and the mere act of doing so will tend to slow you down. The availability of mass in interstellar space could be a limiting factor. :( :( :(
     
  17. Lincsbodger

    Lincsbodger

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    I dont think 10 hydrogen atoms per cubic metre is to be sniffed at, some people are so ungrateful.............
     
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