Are these classed as a maintenance free connection

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Hi,

Need to move a socket around 6" horizontally. Was going to get a pack of blue for the live / neutral and the red for the earth.

Once crimped can I plaster over?

Could this relocation of socket be made by either replacing the whole cable/cables from the other connected outlets or relocating the joint/joints position into the floor/ceiling void and using maintenance free junction boxes?
I personally am not a fan of crimp jointing joints within buried walls, neither am I a fan of solid core crimping.
Beside what has already been mentioned by other informed members regarding crimping, heat-sleeves, safe zones etc.. There will also be a need to test the circuit off prior to recommissioning, to prove it is safe to put back into service. Also as the socket is being relocated and new cable being buried the requirement for RCD protection will apply! So do you have a functional RCD present on this circuit? If not, I would be thinking along the lines of installing RCD/FCU at the current location of existing socket and spurring the socket to the new location.
 
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Crimping solid core does not make a reliable joint unless the crimp force is enough to deform the copper cores enough that they completely fill the inside of the crimp tube. If there is any air space inside the tube then over time the copper cores will deform further to towards that air space. This results in a reduction of the pressure on the contact area between the cores and crimp tube and thus the resistance of the joint increases.

Some crimping methods create an area of cold weld between cores and the crimp tube and / or between the cores. This requires that the seam of the tube is bent into the tube and the edges of the tube seam are forced into the copper of the core(s)
 
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Bernard, filling the tube doesn't depend on the crimping force but does depend on using the right size ferrule for the conductor. All correctly made crimp joints are pressure welds. The crimp force needs to be enough to ensure this There's not much the user can do other than use a good quality crimp tool, and crimps that are the right size preferably from the same manufacturer.
One problem with stranded conductors is that only some of the outer strands are actually welded. This is likely to lead to increasing joint resistance over time. However the loss of cross-sectional area caused by crimping a solid conductor can lead to breakage unless the conductor is supported by the insulation crimp and/or external means such as heat-shrink tubing.
 
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They are the type we are issued with in work for the electricians and they work just fine.
I use them myself for insulated lugs on the motor terminals and I've never had a lead pull free.


I'm sure you do use them at work. I once used the sole of my shoe to put in a screw. Doesn't mean either of them is the right tool for the job.

If you zoom in, the crimpers them selves tell you they are not the correct tool for the job.
image.jpg
 
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Just the other day I was thinking how handy it would be to have a crimp tool in the van that would let me crimp all those pesky 1000mm² cables :D
 
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Bernard, filling the tube doesn't depend on the crimping force but does depend on using the right size ferrule for the conductor.

This is true, but at the same time, since the un-crimped tube has to large enough allow the conductors to be pushed in, the correct tool will "shrink" the diameter of the tube to be a tight fit around the conductor core(s).
 
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Just tried this using my hand ratchet crimpers and my hydraulic crimpers.

image.jpg




Ratchet crimp:
image.jpg




Hydraulic crimp:
image.jpg



Hydraulic crimp:
image.jpg



Ratchet Crimp:
image.jpg
 
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Back to the original question, I would say line crimping and heat shrink is the most practical way of extending a cable in a solid wall where cable replacement is not really possible. A piece of oval tube over it somehow makes it seem a bit better iMO.

Some people can't solder, even if they say they can.

I think I've only line crimped a cable in a (solid) wall only ever once... usually I can find a better way...
 
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Thanks RF.
Never actually looked for that bit of info but will have a look on Monday.
 
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Thanks RF.
Never actually looked for that bit of info but will have a look on Monday.
Why on earth would you need to look for "that bit of info" when the crimping tool you say is suitable for insulated crimps is clearly not suitable for it?
 
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Thanks RF.
Never actually looked for that bit of info but will have a look on Monday.
Why on earth would you need to look for "that bit of info" when the crimping tool you say is suitable for insulated crimps is clearly not suitable for it?

I did not say I 'needed' to look for that bit of info. I actually said, "Never actually looked for that bit of info but will have a look on Monday."

Also I did not say they were suitable for insulated crimps.

This is what I actually said;

"They are the type we are issued with in work for the electricians and they work just fine.
I use them myself for insulated lugs on the motor terminals and I've never had a lead pull free.

BAS, you can be quite informative and helpful at times but at others, possibly when you are bored with life, you can be a pain in the 'arris.

Read more: http://www.diynot.com/diy/threads/are-these-classed-as-a-maintenance-free-connection.446268/#ixzz3rarvmUNV
 
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