Bathroom extractor fan ideas

I

imamartian

I have searched for this topic on here and there are many many posts, but all quite specific. What i need is the bigger picture.

So would anyone be kind enough to broadly describe what's available in the bathroom extractor fan range please?

So far i think i can get:
1. a stand alone fan which i turn on and off when i fancy, and has not relationship with my shower.

2. a fan tied in to the power on the shower which comes on when the shower comes on, and go off when the shower goes off + X minutes.

3. a fan started by a switch in the water supply(?) and similar to 2 (above).


My preference is a fan that comes on when the shower does and goes off when the shower does plus 10 minutes.

Thanks in advance.
 
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You can obtain fans with/without timers and/or humidistats and

have them controlled however you wish - through your mobile 'phone and p.c. if you want.

I'm not quite sure what you want us to say.
 
I

imamartian

Thanks EFLI... i suppose i'm after a cheap 'on when the shower goes on', and 'off 10 mins after the shower goes off' jobby. But i'm not sure of the terminology, or what parts to buy. Don't really need (or want) it i-phone enabled ;)

So i guess... what words do i look out for in Wickes?

Ta
 
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For the actual fan, there are either ceiling/wall mounted types, or inline models which can be fitted elsewhere (e.g in the loft space).
The inline type are far quieter (due to being outside of the room) and can be more powerful since no restriction on physical size.

Both are available with or without a timer, although no timer means the fan will either be left on for far too long, or switched off as soon as the room is vacated, neither of which is ideal. In reality, a timer is essential.

For your options:
1 - Easy and cheap to install, however separate switch means it probably won't be used often or ever.
2 - Possible but far more involved than you might imagine, due to issues with the 40/50A fused circuit for the shower not being suitable for a fan, and connecting the substantial size conductors into a smaller fused unit etc.
3 - Possible and certainly far easier than option 2. If the flow switch is located carefully, can also activate the fan when the toilet is flushed and/or when basin taps are used. Obviously some plumbing work required to install the switch.

The 4th more usual option is to activate the fan when the light is switched on, this being both cheap and easy to do. However does require that the light is turned on every time.

Other choices to activate the fan are:
a. Movement sensor, this means the fan will be activated every time anything moves in the bathroom. Probably not what you want.
b. Humidity sensor. In theory a splendid idea, but in reality poor, since the humidity of the air changes all the time due to various reasons, and will vary throughout the year and due to weather conditions etc. The sensors can be adjusted. They need adjusting often. I would not fit one.
 
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I

imamartian

For the actual fan, there are either ceiling/wall mounted types, or inline models which can be fitted elsewhere (e.g in the loft space).
The inline type are far quieter (due to being outside of the room) and can be more powerful since no restriction on physical size.

Both are available with or without a timer, although no timer means the fan will either be left on for far too long, or switched off as soon as the room is vacated, neither of which is ideal. In reality, a timer is essential.

For your options:
1 - Easy and cheap to install, however separate switch means it probably won't be used often or ever.
2 - Possible but far more involved than you might imagine, due to issues with the 40/50A fused circuit for the shower not being suitable for a fan, and connecting the substantial size conductors into a smaller fused unit etc.
3 - Possible and certainly far easier than option 2. If the flow switch is located carefully, can also activate the fan when the toilet is flushed and/or when basin taps are used. Obviously some plumbing work required to install the switch.

The 4th more usual option is to activate the fan when the light is switched on, this being both cheap and easy to do. However does require that the light is turned on every time.

Other choices to activate the fan are:
a. Movement sensor, this means the fan will be activated every time anything moves in the bathroom. Probably not what you want.
b. Humidity sensor. In theory a splendid idea, but in reality poor, since the humidity of the air changes all the time due to various reasons, and will vary throughout the year and due to weather conditions etc. The sensors can be adjusted. They need adjusting often. I would not fit one.

Brilliant, exactly what i was after.

Do you know if the flow switch + fan + ducting is sold as a kit? If not, what sort of spec fan do i need?

Thanks again.
 
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I

imamartian

i'll be going from bathroom ceiling to soffit via the loft (approx 2 metres).

that fan looks the business thanks.

Do i need a condesate trap?
 
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Do i need a condesate trap?
No, but make sure the ducting slopes downwards towards the outside, and cover the duct with loft insulation.
That inline fan should be installed upside down, with the electronics on top of the fan, otherwise condensation can drip down onto the circuit board causing it to fail.
 
I

imamartian

Do i need a condesate trap?
No, but make sure the ducting slopes downwards towards the outside, and cover the duct with loft insulation.
That inline fan should be installed upside down, with the electronics on top of the fan, otherwise condensation can drip down onto the circuit board causing it to fail.

Thank you very much flameport. Your time is very much appreciated.
 
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The fan, ducting and other small parts are available as a kit - I usually fit this one:
http://www.screwfix.com/p/manrose-chrome-white-25w-in-line-centrifugal-shower-fan-kit/41379
or if there is no loft space (block of flats etc) then this one instead:
http://www.screwfix.com/p/manrose-centrifugal-25w-bathroom-fan/11442
however that makes more noise, and is rather ugly, as it is about 5 inches thick.

The flow switch would be a separate item.

I have had a look for a suitable flow switch ( I am thinking of fitting one for one of my tenents ) she never puts the fan on!
http://electrocontrols.co.uk/product_datasheets/R02.pdf

This one may be suitable but you will need to check the current drawn by your fan and the rating of the switch has to be inductive and not resistive.
 

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