Becoming a primary school teacher

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by TheHappyOne, 5 Dec 2016.

  1. TheHappyOne

    TheHappyOne

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    Hi Folks

    I am a male in my late 40s and thinking of having a career change. I like advising and helping people, so was thinking of becoming a primary school teacher. Would I need a PGCE qualification in order to become one? Am I correct in saying that whereas in a secondary school you can specialise in one or more subjects, but in a primary school you need to be a 'Jack of all trades' ?

    Also, I hear a lot of teachers leaving the profession. Is it really that bad in both primary and secondary schools?

    Your thoughts would greatly be appreciated.


    Thanks
     
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  3. motorbiking

    motorbiking

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    Do you already have a degree?
     
  4. handyjack

    handyjack

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    Providing you are a left wing winger, you should fit right in.
     
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  5. charliegolf

    charliegolf

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    As well as PGCE, there is the Graduate Teacher Training Route (on the job training). The latter requires you to find a placement school- the one which will employ you on completion. The teacher leavers are often those who qualify and either never teach, or leave within about 5 years. They should never have wasted a space on the course. Those who really jack it in for career or other reasons are significantly fewer. Teaching is a good job, but you need to be able to navigate the bullshit to stay sane. I always liked mature entrants, they were, well, mature! Go for it.
     
  6. crystal ball

    crystal ball

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    One of my friends did a one year teacher training course about 15 years ago (already had a degree), there was a £6k grant available then, he left a job as a bank manager, now he is deputy head of a junior school and does not regret going for it.

    My niece did the on the job training to be a science teacher (Bsc in biology) leaving a well paid job in industry, ended up as HoD after 3 years, has now left full time teaching but does supply and private tuition
     
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  8. why would you possibly want to be a teacher...primary age too?..would rather boil my head
     
  9. charliegolf

    charliegolf

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    Horses for courses innit. Very likely, you've had a successful and satisfying working life as a plumber? Now if (as was the case with me) you can have those things as a teacher, then, and only then, there are benefits... Thirteen weeks off, 52 weekends off. You can plan your life around your family, not your income. If you decide to work 8-5:30 like a lot of other people (teachers would love to work 9-3:30 like the persistent myth!), you need not do too much outside school. Pensions are getting poorer by the year. A teacher's pension is always likely to be less-poor than others.

    There's a few reasons. But there are others. There are the more high minded reasons, but frankly, people outside teaching tend to scoff at them...

    CG
     
  10. on a more serious note after my flippant comment.Friend of mine threw in the towel teaching 5 year olds.reckons she worked long hours,weekends etc...after 5 years could not handle the stress and wanted her life back.Went off to do accountancy.Very few men go in for primary teaching..
     
  11. Yeah, a mate of mine also gave up teaching (secondary school) after about 5 years. She said the teaching bit was great, it was all the other stuff that came along. She also didn't stop until about 9pm every week night, lesson planning and marking and was so busy while at school that she didn't even stop to drink, let alone eat lunch. Deffo one of those jobs you have to love I think.
     
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