Bedroom ceiling fans

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I wrote that I agreed with what he said but in practice a down draft cools the body even under a sheet. Don’t know why it didn’t appear.
As eric implied, I can't see that/how it can (unless the bed covering is wet), but most people keep their head/face 'uncovered' when in bed, so those parts will get cooled - and a lot of one's perception of 'how hot one feels' is to do with the temp of head/face.
 
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We have had a ceiling fan in the bedroom for a lot of years, as a result of holidaying in Croatia where we found the fan did cool the room... please don't ask how as it makes b****r all sense to me. On our return home we purchased and fitted a B&Q fan (not one of their cheapies - Mrs Sunray didn't like the look of them) with R/C but retained the wall switch.

That said the unit I have is wired thus and as that light didn't have a perm L it's always been wired to SL: We have found that the unit remembers the last setting of the R/C so in winter the switch simply operates light (it does take longenough to come on that one may think nothing is happening ~2-3 seconds) and summer tends to be low speed fan. View attachment 276848

A friend moved house a number of years back and the conservatory light/fan didn't work. She swore blind it was running when they viewed but the estate agents pictures showed a different lampshade. The fan didn't have a single spec of dust and there was a substantial box of manuals for fitted products and sitting right on top was the new manaul.
MI stated the brown and blue wires of the fitting had to be connected to the brown and blue supply. And it had been wired thus: View attachment 276849 It didn't take more than a second to see the brown/blue cable went to the switch and the red/black went to the FCU beside a DSSO.

Final wiring : View attachment 276852

Switch operates light and R/C operates fan. I've done several like it and sadly at least one was after an electricians actual reply was: "Comtuper says no." mimicking Little Britain.
One caused some head scratching as the lamp was 12V LED and I had to provide a transformer for that.

So getting back to the original question the answer is 'maybe', It's been possible with all of the units I've tried however I've also heard comments that it can't be done, knowing how some kit is constructed I have to accept 'no' may be the right answer.

Right, decided to go ahead and buy a fan. It was setup exactly as you described. L + N to the IR control box, then N + fan L + light L out.

I ditched off the choc block and used wagos instead because 1 - it's naff and 2- it's a royal pain to connect the wires to it with the motor dangling from the ceiling.

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Getting this to function as I want was simply a case of cutting the LED's L wire (orange) where it pops back out of the motor shaft above the motor and connecting to the switched live from the ceiling instead of the IR box

IMG_20220903_101117.jpg


So, a few minutes work and a handful of Wagos and the light switches from the wall as normal, fan switches by remote control, both completely independent of the other. Also as you say, doing it this way has the benefit that the light switches on instantly rather than with a slight delay as standard. I really don't understand why they don't make it this way as standard because I think this is how most people would want it to operate, or at least fit a terminal and explicitly give instructions to make it work one way or the other and state in the marketing specs that it can be done.

For anyone else arriving here by forum search or google asking the same questions, my fan is a Westinghouse Carla, but I would be shocked if pretty much all similar remote control fans on the market don't work in basically the same way.

The luminaire unit on this particular fan is a self contained LED unit.

IMG_20220903_101133.jpg


Before wiring up to make sure the IR box wasn't also performing some voltage step down function I tried looking for the data sheet and couldn't find the exact one but found one from the same series which confirmed that this is straight 230V.

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It would also be relatively easy in this case to modify the fan with a GX53 receptable and fit any GX53 LED you like if e.g. you wanted a different colour temperature or the original breaks.


P.S. Can anyone offer a plausible explanation as to why the last guy wired the old ceiling rose like this?

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P.S. Can anyone offer a plausible explanation as to why the last guy wired the old ceiling rose like this?
Unless I'm missing something, I can't see anything electrically wrong with it. Given that the rose has only three 'sets' of terminals, yet there are four sets of 'wires' that need to be 'joined' (neutral, 'live', switched 'live' and earth) one of those sets of wires has to be joined in a separate connector of some sort (such as the bit of connector block shown). I would imagine that most people would put the 'lives' (brown) into the middle three terminals of the rose, and use the 'additional connector' for the three earths (green/yellow), but there is nothing electrically wrong with doing it 'the other way around', as has been done.

Kind Regards, John
 
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Unless I'm missing something, I can't see anything electrically wrong with it. Given that the rose has only three 'sets' of terminals, yet there are four sets of 'wires' that need to be 'joined' (neutral, 'live', switched 'live' and earth) one of those sets of wires has to be joined in a separate connector of some sort (such as the bit of connector block shown). I would imagine that most people would put the 'lives' (brown) into the middle three terminals of the rose, and use the 'additional connector' for the three earths (green/yellow), but there is nothing electrically wrong with doing it 'the other way around', as has been done.

Kind Regards, John

There is actually a separate earth terminal on the ceiling rose behind the choc block
 
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I fitted a ceiling fan ages ago, my Mrs didn't like it at first but soon changed her mind once we began to use it when we have hot summer nights. I made sure there was strong enough fixings for it in the loft but putting some ply wood above it.

Perhaps the chap that wired it up didn't like trying to stuff three wires into the earth block
 
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Right, decided to go ahead and buy a fan. It was setup exactly as you described. L + N to the IR control box, then N + fan L + light,

Getting this to function as I want was simply a case of cutting the LED's L wire (orange) where it pops back out of the motor shaft above the motor and connecting to the switched live from the ceiling instead of the IR box
Yep easypeazy
So, a few minutes work and a handful of Wagos and the light switches from the wall as normal, fan switches by remote control, both completely independent of the other. Also as you say, doing it this way has the benefit that the light switches on instantly rather than with a slight delay as standard. I really don't understand why they don't make it this way as standard because I think this is how most people would want it to operate, or at least fit a terminal and explicitly give instructions to make it work one way or the other and state in the marketing specs that it can be done.
No I don't understand that either, I have wired several like this now. All I can think is it adds a layer of complication for non technical people, not every visitor to this forum is capable of following advise the way you have:).
For anyone else arriving here by forum search or google asking the same questions, my fan is a Westinghouse Carla, but I would be shocked if pretty much all similar remote control fans on the market don't work in basically the same way.
All of those I've encountered have been much of a muchness.


Thanks for the feedback.
 
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I'd been perusing Fantasia's website looking for information - I bought a used unit very cheaply from a charity shop a few years ago and finally got round to fitting it.
At least for Fantasia, some of their models can be fixed almost directly to the ceiling OR on a drop tube - you buy the parts needed for your install. Also, the light is a separate fitting you add to a basic fan, ditto controls.
Their wall mounted speed control is simply a switch with some capacitors. If you're prepared to go into the unit and alter the wiring, then you can control the motor directly by bringing out 3 separate switched line wires (one for each motor speed). Options depend on how easy it is to run new cabling - in principle you can run a 6 core cable (or a T&E plus a 3C&E) and not need any remotes etc.
 

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