Best saw for cutting hardwood doors

Joined
9 May 2010
Messages
92
Reaction score
1
Location
Hertfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
Hi, can anyone tell me what would be the best saw to use to trim down hardwood doors (and other items) to get the best finish. Ie would it be one of the use and throw type saws or an older fashioned saw that you sharpen the teeth of or an electric type?
Basically I want the finest cut without it taking me all day and something that's going to give a pretty straight line.

Thnks[/list]
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
3 Sep 2006
Messages
36,495
Reaction score
5,149
Location
West Mids
Country
United Kingdom
Generally any handsaw will do, but you will still need to take the same precautions in terms of a guide for straight cutting and prevention of chipping the back edge

Look for a "throw-away" saw with hardened teeth and the higher the TPI the smoother the cut - most now are marketed as general or specific use, rough or fine cut or first or second fix

A electric saw would have to be a circular saw and then you would need a fine blade - so it gets expensive unless you have lots of cutting to do

In all cases you would probably need to finish with a plane or sanding
 
Joined
9 May 2010
Messages
92
Reaction score
1
Location
Hertfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
So what your saying is that a throw away saw is just as good as the old fashion wooden handle saws for this job?
Point taken on the circular saw blades! I've started to do a lot of doors. I started out using a jigsaw but I couldn't get a straight, clean line.
Then I went onto the throw away and they seem to blunten very quickly.

Thanks for your comments
 
Joined
3 Sep 2006
Messages
36,495
Reaction score
5,149
Location
West Mids
Country
United Kingdom
So what your saying is that a throw away saw is just as good as the old fashion wooden handle saws for this job?

Yes that is why the old fashioned saw is .... old fashioned. They go blunt and out of set, so need frequent attention

But, you need to get a quality disposable one from a good brand, not a £2.99 one from china!
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
14 Mar 2006
Messages
18,998
Reaction score
2,258
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
For trimming doors buy a power plane, even the cheapies give good results.
 
Joined
9 May 2010
Messages
92
Reaction score
1
Location
Hertfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
I found that with the power plane when I got to the end of the length that the timber split and if I tried to start from each outer edge and meet in the middle that it wasnt meeting flush.

The saw I'm using is an irwin 880

Any one recommend another?
 
Joined
30 Sep 2011
Messages
8,896
Reaction score
2,037
Location
Lancashire
Country
United Kingdom
A corded rip saw preferably running on a guide rail with a sharp fine tooth blade (on a 190mm saw that means something like 48 to 60 teeth). The trick to ending the cut cleanly is to use a try square and knife the line before making the cut. Also use the try square to check how square the saw blade is (most saws aren't that square IMHO).
 
Joined
30 Sep 2011
Messages
8,896
Reaction score
2,037
Location
Lancashire
Country
United Kingdom
How deep for the knife line? 2mm? You think this will help when using electric plane?T
1 to 2mm - deep enough to sever the edge fibres. You still need to exit the timber with a saw very, very slowly, though. It may or may not help with a power planer because a planer exerts much more pressure behind the grain than a saw. I wouldn't go that way, myself. If you insist on planing through from one side to the other then the correct approach is always to attach a break-out block (piece of scrap) at the exit side using a sash cramp and then plane the door and break out block as one. This block supports the timber and prevents spelching. Incidentally the same technique works if you are sawing as well (and doesn't require the knifing of the grain)
 
Joined
14 Mar 2006
Messages
18,998
Reaction score
2,258
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
I found that with the power plane when I got to the end of the length that the timber split and if I tried to start from each outer edge and meet in the middle that it wasnt meeting flush.

The saw I'm using is an irwin 880

Any one recommend another?
You are not using the plane correctly, you need to reduce cut depth as you get closer to finish line , work from both ends never over running the edge.
More passes are required over the end grain than the rest of the door.
 
Joined
9 May 2010
Messages
92
Reaction score
1
Location
Hertfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
I found that with the power plane when I got to the end of the length that the timber split and if I tried to start from each outer edge and meet in the middle that it wasnt meeting flush.

The saw I'm using is an irwin 880

Any one recommend another?
You are not using the plane correctly, you need to reduce cut depth as you get closer to finish line , work from both ends never over running the edge.
More passes are required over the end grain than the rest of the door.

You think the setting is too high? You suggesting I pass over more times on a lower setting rather than less set at 1.5mm for example?
Surely your not saying alter the setting midway through planing the edge?
 
Joined
14 Mar 2006
Messages
18,998
Reaction score
2,258
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
No, start at 2mm, reduce after first pass to 1mm and reduce again to .5mm when close to finished size. The more you remove with each pass the more likely you are to make a mistake which is difficult to rectify. Slow and sure.
The end grain of the door will require extra passes as it is tougher on the blade than running along the grain.[always from outside edge inwards].
This might help explain problems with end grain.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuDoHQOJZmg
 
Joined
9 May 2010
Messages
92
Reaction score
1
Location
Hertfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
I've got to do one tomorrow so I'll try out the planing from outer edges technique.
Thanks for the video link. It's just like you said but it helps to actually see it.

Thank you
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top