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Bitumen as a pipe sealant?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Multiplex, 14 Apr 2006.

  1. Multiplex

    Multiplex

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    Hi,

    I`m working on a property at the moment which was built in 1958 and is a small flat in a large block.

    Unfortunately the problem with this flat is the drainage pipes are all rusting very badly, and as we pulled the old basin out the waste pipe just fell apart.

    There was basically a small bit of useable pipe sticking out of the floor, but it had a hole in the side. So what my friend did was put a new plastic pipe in the hole, and then cover the whole thing with a very very thick layer of bitumen.

    Is this something that seems sensible? I`ve done a search and haven`t found this to be very common for plumbing.

    Any suggestions very gratefully received.

    Simon.
     
  2. masona

    masona

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    Not very clever because bitumen have a softening point in certain heat which will be running sometime or later.
     
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  4. Gasguru

    Gasguru

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    What is the old waste pipe made of, lead, cast iron, galvanised steel.

    Depending on the plastic bitumen may attack it.

    Under your lease the drainage pipework may be the responsibilty of the freeholder - they may be obliged to replace it. (but at the leaseholders expense :( )
     
  5. Multiplex

    Multiplex

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    Very interesting, thanks for the replies. Good point regarding bitumen softening at a high temperature...I wonder if this will be a problem or not!!

    The pipe I believe is cast iron and is just crumbling away. Doesn´t look very good for the next ten or twenty years in my opinion.

    Simon.
     
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