chasing electrical cable into a wall

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Hi all,

It sounds like a simple thing, but I'm confused about what regulations govern this.

I notice my house tends to have metal capping over the wires. Is this an older regulation, from before the RCD requirement came into force, or is it still relevant today? As far as I can see there's no reason for it any more as you may as well use steel trunking or nothing. Can someone please confirm?

Secondly, I read somewhere that cabling has to be protected from trowel damage from the plasterer. Can someone point me to the regulation that talks about this, and/or tell me what it means for me if I'm running a cable up an unplastered (brick) wall, that will be plastered later?

Thanks!
 
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I notice my house tends to have metal capping over the wires. Is this an older regulation, from before the RCD requirement came into force, or is it still relevant today? As far as I can see there's no reason for it any more as you may as well use steel trunking or nothing.
It's just to hold the cable(s) in place.
Plastic is used today - if wanted.
It offers NO protection in the electrical sense.

You could use plastic conduit which may allow the cables to be replaced but will reduce the current-carrying capacity.

Secondly, I read somewhere that cabling has to be protected from trowel damage from the plasterer.
I, too, have heard that all plasterers are ham-fisted buffoons who like damaging their trowels.

Can someone point me to the regulation that talks about this,
There is none.

tell me what it means for me if I'm running a cable up an unplastered (brick) wall, that will be plastered later?
Either chase it into the brick/block and clip or use capping - metal or plastic.
 
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No requirements to cap chased cable. Just get deep enough so trowel want damage the cable but still comply to building regulation of chase depths.
If walls are bare you can clip or cap if you wish, it is unlikely the plasterer is going to damage the cable!
 
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No requirement to use capping or conduit over PVC PVC cables, but for the pennies it costs I recommend you do use it.

Plasterers can damage cables - have encountered enough damaged cables coiled up in the back boxes.

And if you should happen to drill through a cable at a later date there's a better chance of repairing/replacing it if it's in capping or conduit.

Your choice.
 
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Luckily most of the builders/plasterers I've worked with have dot 'n' dabbed boards up before skimming. Sadly they quite often throw a blob of dab over the cable. :(
 
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Sadly they quite often throw a blob of dab over the cable. :(
Providing you have pulled enough cable through at the accessory, that would be a good thing, keeps the cable secure and in place and prevents abrasion to cable against wall.
When every I d'n'd, I also surround the back box with adhesive.
 
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Thanks for all the responses. I have a few more related questions though:

Can you get 'flat' capping, for covering over where you've recessed the cable into the brick? I haven't seen it anywhere and wonder if it exists. I tried to flatten out a bit of capping but that just made it a horrible mess!

I've possibly been a bit of a fool and put a back box recess above an air brick. I just thought I'd ask if there's any reason why that's not allowed. Following the safe zone down from the socket my cable will come out directly in front of it. The socket will be in the back of a 600mm kitchen unit and I don't really want to take the cable to the side as I'll be putting in other units there.

Finally, for kitchen wiring where I've got a bunch of appliances (dishwasher, washing machine etc...), I'll have electrical sockets, cold water supply, and waste. Presumably these have to be a certain distance apart. Can anyone point me to the rules or 'best practise' about this?

thanks!
N.
 
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Can you get 'flat' capping, for covering over where you've recessed the cable into the brick?
If it's recessed, why do you want to put a cover over it?


Finally, for kitchen wiring...
For kitchen wiring, if you're in England or Wales, you must either use a registered electrician or apply for Building Regulations approval in advance.

http://www.diynot.com/wiki/electrics:part-p

Depending on where you live and what you plan to do, it may be that the only advice which does not lead you into a complete mess is "get an electrician", or "ask your electrician".
 
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In my experience plasterers can and do 'nick' cables with their trowels. Although this would possibly be seen as their fault, as the electrician you must decide how you are to protect your cables from external influences !
And blame doesn't help you at 6pm on a Friday night fault finding !!!
 
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If it's recessed, why do you want to put a cover over it?
So cable can be pulled through, at a later time, if necessary without pulling the plaster off. I admit it's unlikely to be needed, but if it was little extra effort I couldn't see why not.
For kitchen wiring, if you're in England or Wales, you must either use a registered electrician or apply for Building Regulations approval in advance.
Yes, I know that. I also know that my application for BR approval is unlikely get my questions answered satisfactorily.
Depending on where you live and what you plan to do, it may be that the only advice which does not lead you into a complete mess is "get an electrician", or "ask your electrician".
There is a level of risk associated with any DIY work. Let's not argue about that here, it's been done to death in other threads. Please if you can't (or won't) answer the questions can you let someone else?

N.
 
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So cable can be pulled through, at a later time, if necessary without pulling the plaster off.
Then put it in conduit.

I also know that my application for BR approval is unlikely get my questions answered satisfactorily.
Indeed not - you have to tell them how you are going to do it, not ask them to tell you.


There is a level of risk associated with any DIY work. Let's not argue about that here, it's been done to death in other threads. Please if you can't (or won't) answer the questions can you let someone else?
Fair enough - you go off and notify, think you'll be able to get an electrician to sign off your DIY work, and then find you can't.

But please do not at that point come crying here asking what you can do when you refused to give us the information we need to give you proper guidance.
 
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Fair enough - you go off and notify, think you'll be able to get an electrician to sign off your DIY work, and then find you can't.
Where do you get this? I have always been able to get someone to sign off my work. Finding a Gas-Safe engineer was a bit of a challenge, but last time I needed to do this for electric, it was pretty much the second person I asked IIRC.

But please do not at that point come crying here asking what you can do when you refused to give us the information we need to give you proper guidance.
Don't understand this, what information did I refuse to give?
 
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Where do you get this? I have always been able to get someone to sign off my work. Finding a Gas-Safe engineer was a bit of a challenge, but last time I needed to do this for electric, it was pretty much the second person I asked IIRC.
I hope you crash and burn.

I hope they catch up with the lying charlatan(s) you've used, and that you get swept up in the net.

I know it's unlikely to happen, but what is likely is that I will call you a lying scumbag, and have nothing more to do with you.


Don't understand this, what information did I refuse to give?
You've given it now. You intend to conspire with a fellow low-life to lie.

I'm clicking this now.
 
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BAS, I've known you for years, even though I've not been posting on here. Mate, take a chill pill. The stress isn't worth it.
 
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I honestly don't see the issue. Why would I care so long as what I've done is safe?

Anyhow, I do take offense to being called a lying scumbag, particularly when I've lied about nothing, so I've reported the abusive post, whatever good that will do.
 
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