Combined Heat and Carbon Monoxide Detector?

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I was speaking with an electrician recently who informed me he could install a heat detector in the ceiling of the kitchen plus a separate carbon monoxide detector also in the ceiling (both mains operated).

That is, as I have a gas operated combi boiler in the kitchen (I do currently have a battery operated carbon monoxide detector beside it).

However, it occurred to me that perhaps there is a combined heat and carbon monoxide detector on the market which would mean only one detector on the ceiling.

Is such a product available? Thanks.
 
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Stick with your battery Carbon Monoxide alarm. Check its in date, and away you go.
 
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I wonder why the electrician suggested only a heat detector in the kitchen (smoke detectors elsewhere)?

Do smoke detectors go off regularly when located in kitchens (burnt toast etc)?

Is it normal to also locate a smoke detector in the kitchen as well as a heat detector?
 
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I wonder why the electrician suggested only a heat detector in the kitchen (smoke detectors elsewhere)? ... Do smoke detectors go off regularly when located in kitchens (burnt toast etc)?
Yep, that's the reason.
Is it normal to also locate a smoke detector in the kitchen as well as a heat detector?
No - for the above reason. Adding a smoke detector would defeat the point of having a heat detector in a kitchen.

Plenty of people do have (only) a smoke detector in or near their kitchen - but, unless they are very careful cooks, they'll often manage to set it off!

Kind Regards, John
 
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Do smoke detectors go off regularly when located in kitchens (burnt toast etc)?
Yes.

The ion type can be triggered by invisible particles caused by cooking, such that opening the oven door activates the smoke alarm. Or frying / grilling various foods. Visible smoke is not required.

The optical type will react to smoke particles but are just as easily set set off by steam and moisture, so it's virtually inevitable that any smoke alarm in a kitchen will be activated frequently, leading to the occupants removing the battery or even the entire alarm. Placing a plastic bag over it is another popular fix.
 
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