Condensation on aluminum window frames

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Hi!

I've moved into a flat with aluminum window frames which I think don't have a thermal break as they are cold to the touch.
Humidity indoors is around 50% and I get loads of condensation on the frames (nothing on the window glass).
I have googled extensively without finding a solution to this problem.
I was thinking if I were to paint a coat of clear water repellent sealer like this product: https://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-water-repellent-seal-clear-5ltr/57474
on the frames would this avoid the formation of condensation?
Can't wait to hear your opinions!
Thanks!
 
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No.

How is the flat ventilated?

Is wet washing ever draped inside your home?
 
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The trickle vents are always open.
I always use extractor fans when cooking or showering.
I do dry the washing indoors turning on the dehumidifier.
Washing or no washing, the humidity level is always around 50% yet when there is a thermal excursion i.e. inside temperature 20C and outside 10C condensation keeps on forming.
I can't believe that there is no type of thermal wrap tape (with a finish and function similar to vinyl wrap) to stick onto the frames....
: (
 
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If they are old aluminium framed windows with no thermal break then the only way you're going to fix the problem is by replacing the windows, reducing the temperature of the flat or reducing the humidity in the house. Water will condense on any cold surface the only way to stop that from happening is stop that surface being cold relative to the temperature in the flat.
 
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the water repellent wont work -its designed for porous surfaces like stone or timber.

Your best option would be to try rain x designed for glass -as used on car windows, available from halfords -Im not sure it would work on n aly frame, it might do if very smooth powder coating.

or you could buy a tubular heater to sit on the window board

If you are getting the problem when you get up in the morning, it could be the curtains are closing off the window reveal so the air gets colder over night.

Even thermally broken aly isnt amazing, it still feels cold -but prob enough to stop most condensation.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sunhouse-T...F8&qid=1543399028&sr=8-3&keywords=tube+heater
 
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The trickle vents are always open.
I always use extractor fans when cooking or showering.
I do dry the washing indoors turning on the dehumidifier.
Washing or no washing, the humidity level is always around 50% yet when there is a thermal excursion i.e. inside temperature 20C and outside 10C condensation keeps on forming.
I can't believe that there is no type of thermal wrap tape (with a finish and function similar to vinyl wrap) to stick onto the frames....
: (
Drying washing indoors is the equivalent of throwing a jug of water at the windows, dehumidfier won't cope with it, you need a tumble dryer.
High humidity suggests poor ventilation as John mentions. The winds are not a problem, its your lifestyle.
 
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The problem it's not summer it's as damp out side as inside your home so opening windows or vents won't help much I suggest hiring a good humidifier for a week to pull any moister out of your home if this improves you should look at buying one regards Norman
 
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I have old aluminium single glazed framed windows which get condensation on the glass and the frames. I'm certainly not going to replace them as they need no maintenance and seem to last forever. What I am going to do is install some secondary glazing.
I'm guessing yours must be double glazed if you're getting no condensation on the glass?
A thought I have is that if you put some thermal insulation on the inside surface of the frames, that could solve the problem - some kind of foam self adhesive draught proofing strip is what I would try.
 
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Well just keep trying different options to see what works best as condensation is just moister trying to escape when you see a kettle boiling and the steam dissapeares but it doesn't it finds a cold stop and turn back to moisterall the best Norman
 
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yes drying clothes indoors is not a good idea. even the act of cooking and breathing puts moisture in your air. this moisture will condense into water when it touches a cold surface. you need to make less water in the air, more ventilation and more warmth inside i think.. unless its very damp outside when you go out leave a window wide open if you can.
 

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