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Creating an access point (carpeting)?

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by Soggy Bottom, 3 Jun 2019.

  1. foxhole

    foxhole

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    If you need to get under the floor to service the pump it’s not installed correctly , should be able to lift it out to service or replace without going under floor.
    If there is that much space you could move the hatch to a more accessible location .
     
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  3. Soggy Bottom

    Soggy Bottom

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    Is that like one of them lateral thinking puzzles?

    You'll have to solve that one for me then because i'm certainly not smart enough to figure it out.

    So the water comes upwards from the ground the house is built on. It doesn't come sideways, it doesn't come top down and drip in to the subfloor, it comes from underneath the house and goes upwards and then flows towards the front of the house.

    So while i'm not smart enough to work a solution to what you said, i am at least smart enough to know that a pump by default will need to be in such a spot to be able to get rid of the water - and therefore work. So with the water being under the floorboards of our living room then obviously this is also where the sump pump needs to be. No good it being installed in the loft for example or indeed anywhere else where the water isn't.

    And since you need some kind of floor then you can't be without floorboards. Chipboard flooring is a no go (been in touch with the manufacturer of chipboard flooring who advised against using their products in such a situation).

    Which based on what you said begs the question .... how do you get to the sump pump, which is where the water is, without getting under the floor?


    The pump is enclosed in a chamber which is then seated in to the sump/ground and has limestone chippings layering the sump and all around the chamber. This is sealed with removable bolts. It's got the stones and the lid to the chamber to stop any crap getting inside it and clogging the pump.

    So you can't just pull it out freely as it'd defeat the purpose of having a chamber and lid. If you pull the chamber out then all the stone then falls in on itself & you need to dig it out again to re-seat the chamber/pump. You also clearly reset the frequency that the pump kicks in as it'll be at a different height now.


    This is all aside from the fact that the company selling it, after numerous questions, has said it's been installed correctly - with the stone acting as filtration.



    No offence but i've discussed the pump elsewhere on this message board. We can discuss it more in that thread if you like but i'm here about access through a carpet.
     
  4. foxhole

    foxhole

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    There are many solutions too a problem , you seems to concentrate on only one , even though the problem is if your own making .
     
  5. StephenStephen

    StephenStephen

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    I am curious, knowing nothing about such things - why does the pumps sit under the floor, rather than the end of the pipe being under the floor, with the pump inline on the pipe in a more convenient location?
     
  6. Why Not Indeed

    Why Not Indeed

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    You'd need to have a pipe which could resist the pressure of a vacuum [ie outside pressing in], which is harder than making a pipe which can resist inside pressing out. Not impossible obviously but it would be more rigid, harder to route, etc. Also when you suck vertically it's atmospheric pressure at the bottom of the pipe doing the pushing rather than the pump doing the pulling.
     
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  8. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    That is a sensible question, rather than a sump pump, how about an inline self- priming pump mounted somewhere more accessible fed from a suction pipe? You would need a separate float switch and maybe a contactor working from the switch.

    If one floor socket would be too small, have you thought you could mount two side by side, with some removable timber where the join to support them? Even two side by side might be too small, so why not fabricate an access panel using plastic angle for the sides, for the surround and similar for the removable panel. Removable timbers underneath to support the panel, on steel angle brackets. It cannot be that difficult to make something which would work for a solution.
     
  9. Sheila Westfall

    Sheila Westfall

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    I have the same problem! Did you ever solve?
     
  10. Nige F

    Nige F

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    Hello, a couple of points - you're better starting a new thread ( forum rules ) and you can describe/photo your setup. Also are you in the USA ? This is a UK site but a lot of things are similar here .(y)
     
  11. Sheila Westfall

    Sheila Westfall

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    I am in the US. My floor is concrete - so mire challenging!
     
  12. Sheila Westfall

    Sheila Westfall

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    I was hoping to hear about YOUR solution
     
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