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Damp / Condensation on Party wall

Discussion in 'Building' started by SALL2009, 14 Mar 2019.

  1. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Observe the water meter. Look at the glass window. Is there a bubble in the middle? Is it turning? It will turn all the time water is flowing. Much more sensitive then the numbers, and no need to wait a day.
     
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  3. SALL2009

    SALL2009

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    Never seen a water meter in my life, so that will be an experience. lol
     
  4. bobasd

    bobasd

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    by an large you dont cure risin damp you just contain it for some years - usly by hackin off the affected plaster an renderin back up as a remedial measure.

    OP,youve posted no floorplan or footprint of your house marked with the at risk walls, solid an suspended floors, air bricks an ther venting pipes, plumbing pipe runs, rads an outside positions of gulley an manhole.

    th e gulley business might be a red herring.

    until you have a good idea of a "root cause" - of whats causin what looks like rising damp then slow down -
    no need for Dyna or any similar "damp unblocking co" or to be cracking out the kitchen floor conc hopin it will be a cureall.

    anyone who comes lookin for work will find it an you will pay for it.
     
  5. SALL2009

    SALL2009

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    Thanks guys. looks like your suggestions were right and the leak seems to be originating from the centre of the wall (probably the radiator). I re-pressurised the central heating system today and the rad in question was turned off. So I have opened the valves to ensure water is flowing to it. Once I took the paper off near the rad, that part seems the wettest on wall, hence possibly the source. The pipes seem to have green corrosion on them too. Going to wait a day, I guess to see if the pressure drops again and the area around it gets wet or not.

    No signs of any plumbing in the loft. here is some fresh pictures I took today.

    IMG_20190318_192103.jpg IMG_20190318_192447.jpg

    IMG_20190318_185630.jpg
    IMG_20190318_192126.jpg IMG_20190318_190455.jpg IMG_20190318_190509.jpg
     

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  6. bobasd

    bobasd

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    your copper flow an return pipes have been installed under pressure, they should have been installed deeper an sheathed or ducted.
    all ccopper turns green if buried.
    maybe your pipes are insulated under the concrete patch?

    first thing, open up the obvious line of fresh lookin concrete patching that goes from suspended floor to radiator.
    an then look for leaks or rising ground water.

    youve got damp signs, about 9 or 10ft away from thr rad, on the chimney brest .long way from any possible rad pipe leak?

    thers lots of signs of damp in the floor an the wall -
    an no sign of a membrane under the solid floor?

    i think you should dig out all the solid tiled area an replace all rottin floorin with a full suspended floor.
    the transition floor plate area from kit to din room will need lookin at.
    install 9" x 6" air bricks for through ventilation.

    temp remove the rad.
    an then hack off all plaster up to wainscot rail height as far as chimney breast.
    remove an check all skirting for rot.
     
  7. bobasd

    bobasd

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    OP, stay out of that loft - no need for you to be up ther an you could easy get hurt.

    thers no need for you havin a moisture meter.

    stay away from all chemical injections as a so called cure for rising damp.
     
  8. Why is that ? They used to be used a lot for treatment of rising damp in existing walls and were approved by NHBC in conversions of old buildings. On existing plastered walls IFIRC plaster was hacked off to a height of at least 1.2m above floor level, chemical dpc injected before wall replastered.
     
  9. bobasd

    bobasd

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    because they dont work - like dutch tubes an electrosmosis an hydrotech, all approved by someone at some time.dry rods are now the thing an seem to work now an again but its to soon to now.
    chemical injections were silicone or similar pumpedinto brick then into mortar
    when brick injections didnt work except to destroy brickwork.
    later water based injection fluids were used - ie pumpin gallons of water into damp masonry. way to go.

    thers lots more to this business an its best you dont comment or give advice unless you now the score.

    you dont "replaster" by the way, you render with sand an lime.
     
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  11. I think I was saying chemical (silicone injection ) dpc was used a lot and was approved by NHBC so perhaps you should take it up with them about the number of properties they warrantied using this technique and give them the benefit of your expert advice.
    Incidentally I didn't mention the tubes method which I never experienced ,and was always a bit sceptical about electro osmosis anyway although I worked on jobs where it was used.
    By the way ,what business are you talking about , building construction in general or just damp proof coursing in particular.
     
  12. bobasd

    bobasd

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    Removed
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 20 Mar 2019
  13. SALL2009

    SALL2009

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    Updated below..
     

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    Last edited: 23 Mar 2019
  14. bobasd

    bobasd

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    where an when was DPC Injections "approved" by NHBC - give me one single example?show me evidence?
    ther initial warranty dont cover any DPC chemical injecting.
    an ther next ddeal the Buildmark warranty definitly dont cover DPC injections.

    NHBC state clearly that ther inspectors dont inspect foundational work.

    given NHBC almost entirely cover new builds why would they approve injecting insulated cavity walls?

    you now have to ask whats bein talked about -
     
  15. SALL2009

    SALL2009

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    Thanks guys for all your help. Hopefully the concrete floor is getting replaced in the next few days. I just have a couple of more questions, if someone can help.

    1. While taking the paper off from the damp area, I have noticed a few damp patches much higher up from the floor level. I have also noticed some damp patches in the wall upstairs (inline with these patches)

    The house has had cavity wall insulation done (if that makes a difference).

    IMG_20190322_200811.jpg IMG_20190322_205402.jpg

    2. Do these look like signs of condensation and a separate issue. The downstairs lounge seems air tights. There are no vents on the windows or patio doors and it seems a vent has boon blocked off. (Please see the picture attached.)

    IMG_20190322_204847.jpg IMG_20190322_204855.jpg

    Is this some sort of a vent that should be open on the inside of the house?

    IMG_20190322_205128.jpg
     
  16. arkie

    arkie

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    The white vent in pic2 (last post) to me says boarded over fireplace? Is the chimney capped and in good condition. It may be a separate issue though, was the house empty for a while?
     
  17. SALL2009

    SALL2009

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    Yeah the chimney had been boarded over. But the vent is in bedroom. No vent in the living room.

    I'm getting someone to look at the chimney stack too. The survey recommend getting that looked at.

    Yeah the property has been empty for around 6 months. Not sure how often the heating has been turned on. Could this explain most of the walls feeling cold and damp?
     
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